Episode 117

Turning Adversity into Opportunity and Succeeding in the New “Normal” of Ecommerce

Ryan Moran - Capitalism.com
April 28, 2020
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This is an episode a couple years in the making.  I’m a huge Ryan Daniel Moran fan.  We had dinner together after an event for speakers at an event in LA a few years ago.  Then we both got busy.  Ryan came on the show to discuss some burning topics facing all entrepreneurs right now.  

  • Advice for an eCommerce company who’s struggling right now in the pandemic
  • Advice for an e-commerce company who’s excelling right nowThe number 1 way to be instantly happier right now (and it leads to better business outcomes)
  • How Ryan thinks about eComm companies to invest in - it’s way more about the leader and the product than anything else.
  • Not playing the comparison game
  • How to instantly be happier where you are right now
  • The 3 phases of growing to $1 million in 12 Months. 

Connect with Guest:

Ryan Daniel Moran - Founder of Capitalism.com and The Capitalism Conference

Via LinkedIn

Via Facebook

Via Twitter

Via Instagram


Capitalism.com - Create the Change

Via Website

Via LinkedIn

Via Facebook

Via Twitter

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Capitalism with Ryan Daniel Moran YouTube Channel

Podcasts by Capitalism.com

12 Months to $1 Million” Book by Ryan Daniel Moran


Mentioned in this episode:

12 Months to $1 Million” Book by Ryan Daniel Moran

Podcasts by Capitalism.com

Capitalism.com Podcast Episode with Moiz Ali

Exit Strategy Podcast with Moiz Ali

Native Deodorant

The Capitalism Conference (CapCon)

The One Percent - Capitalism.com

Everything Is F*cked” Book by Mark Mason - Amazon

Episode Transcript:

Brett:

Well hello and welcome to another edition of the eCommerce Evolution Podcast. I'm your host Brett Curry, CEO OMG commerce. And I got to say I am beyond excited about today's episode. This is an episode that I've been dreaming about, thinking about for a couple of years probably or more.

Brett:

My guest today really doesn't need an introduction, but I'm going to do it anyway. So today I've got Ryan Daniel Moran, he's the founder of capitalism.com and the capitalism conference, which I was just sharing with him earlier, I've had several people, several entrepreneurial friends, people I trust say it's the best event they've ever been to. I shamefully have never been. So I will remedy that once we're allowed to leave our houses and do events again at some point. Ryan's also the author of a brand new book called 12 Months To 1 million. I'm a huge fan of Ryan's podcast. He's introduced me to some amazing people, financial planners and other things and so consumed a lot of his content. I love the way he thinks about business and about building brands and the way he's just super honest and relatable and fun. And so with that, Ryan, welcome to the show man. Thanks for taking the time.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Brett. Thank you so much. I'm not sure I can live up to that podcast. So thanks for listening everybody. See you later.

Brett:

And we're done. That's a wrap.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

See you. Thanks for coming.

Brett:

That's amazing. It's amazing. So we were just talking now, hopefully people will be listening to this podcast for years to come. We are though recording during the midst of quarantine and lockdown and there's potentially an end in sight. We hear people, different states talking about opening up beginning of or whatever which is a few weeks away at the time of this recording. So I want to dig into a few things. I want to talk about your mindset. I want to talk about the way you're processing this environment specifically related to e-commerce. And then we'll get into some other fun stuff, investing and other cool stuff, which I'm excited to pick your brain about. So I know you're viewing this as an opportunity, right? It's a challenge too. There's hardships, it's difficult. We don't want to downplay that. But why and how are you viewing this as an opportunity?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

True story. Yesterday I was speaking with someone that I hadn't met before and the Zoom fired up and that person said, "How are you doing Ryan?" And I said, "I'm doing really well. It's great to meet you. How are you doing?" And he said, "I'm fine all things considered." And I didn't even think about it. I said, "Oh, what's to be considered?" And he looked kind of surprised by that statement, but I was being very genuine in my question because I think in all situations and in all cases, you are whatever you're considering. That phrase, all things considered, it's just all things considered. I mean, are you considering the fact that you woke up this morning in a comfortable bed and got to spend your day structured however you chose it with people that you chose to spend it with? I mean, all things considered, the sun shone this morning and it is about to be the best time a year. I mean the fact that we're listening to a podcast right now about business and investing-

Brett:

Yeah, for free, wherever we want to listen to it.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

For free. Yes. I mean, and somebody will say that's trite. That's easy to overlook. Everything is easy to overlook. It's easy to overlook the number of deaths from a pandemic. It's easy to not think about it. It's easy to not think about the economy. It's easy to not think about how many people died of a heart attack this week. And I don't mean to be crass, I just mean that we're in control of whatever we focus on. And when we're having things beamed at us all of the time, it requires us to be more intentional about focusing on what it is that we want. And so I just made the decision about three weeks ago that I was no longer going to pay attention to the things that didn't serve me.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

A good kind of comparison to this is in college, like every good college person, I went down a bit of a conspiracy theory rabbit hole. I think most people go through that period in their life where they're like, they question what's normal, they question the narrative, they question the official story. And so I went down a little bit of a rabbit hole. And after a while, I finally just had to ask myself the question is consuming all of this information about this topic making my life better? And it wasn't. It was making my life far worse. It was making me scared to make decisions. It was making me fearful of other people. It was making me really negative. And I feel the same way-

Brett:

And conspiracy theories are kind of like junk food, right? Where they're like really tasty and really enticing. But afterwards you're like, oh.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I've heard them described as pessimistic porn. It's like bad news. You can't stop looking at it. But if someone else walks in the room you're like, "Oh, what? No, I'm not going to conspiracy theories." And so I view the pandemic as kind of similar, not that I'm suggesting it's a conspiracy theory, but just that the idea of does consuming more and more information and making evaluations of what could or might not happen serve you? And the only way that I think it might serve us is if we evaluate how we can use this to become better business owners, to be better family members, better leaders. How if there was a way to turn this into an opportunity, what might it be? I mean for me personally, I needed some way to turn this into a positive quickly. So I just decided, you know what I'm going to do is I'm just going to get into the best shape of my life.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I'm just going to really clean up my diet. I'm going to really focus on my mental health. I'm going to read books, I'm going to journal. Even if I get nothing productive done, I could look back and say, "You know what I did in quarantine? I spent a ton of time with my daughter and my youngest son and I read books and I journaled and I thought about what I wanted and I got into a great shape and I went for long walks and I saw nature and I listened to podcasts." And you can turn that into whatever experience you want. So that's how I'm handling quarantine.

Brett:

I love it. And I think it's really just a shift because we've all probably gone to some dark places at least momentarily during all of this. For me, I've had a couple of bouts of just kind of wrestling with anger a little bit like man, why can't we just fix this? Or why does this have to happen or why ... But I get over it pretty quickly. I think what I'm hearing you say lines up with kind of my thinking too, is that if you could go 100% into what you can control and zero or as close to 0% on the things you can't control, that puts you in a lot better space because you can't control when the lockdown ends. You can't control the spread of COVID-19 other than just your limits. And certainly you can't impact any of those so why worry about them? Spend 100% of your time on things you can control.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

That's exactly right in all cases, all the time especially right now. I mean, you know what? I've had a lot of conversations with entrepreneur friends who have expressed that for what some reason they're feeling a little bit happier than normal and I wasn't quite sure why that might be at first. And I started to process it because I could feel it when I saw the opposite happen for me. I mean I had one really bad day when it happened. And I caught it. It was when I talked to a friend and all they were talking about is how much they were killing it and how much they were selling and how they were growing. And I had this little twinge of, oh, like I'm behind. That little thought in the brain that is like I'm behind. I'm not enough. I'm not growing as fast as I should be.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

But what was interesting is all up until that point, I hadn't heard a single thing about anybody else crushing it or killing it in three weeks. And I think that's why a lot of entrepreneurs are feeling a little bit of this like I feel kind of relieved. I feel kind of at peace because we're not playing this comparison game that is constantly going on in the internet marketing world about how this person's ad is killing it while this person's product is growing. And this a hole Ryan Moran sold his business. And like all these wins that everybody else is having except for me, that thought loop that is going on in so many of our brains has quieted down because we don't see all of the wins of everyone while we're all focused on this problem. And I think that's actually then a really healthy step back for a lot of the entrepreneurial world.

Brett:

Yeah, almost like a reset, you know? And I love the fact that you mentioned reading. My wife and I, we were consuming potentially a decent amount of Netflix in the evening. I was still getting a lot of work done, still getting a lot of work done. But after a few nights I was like, "I'm like tired of this. Like I want to do something productive." So we started reading a little bit more and we've been going on walks with my kids. So I don't know if you know this but I have eight kids. But we have been yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, not Amish or Mormon, just 8 kids.

Brett:

And so we do go on walks every night. Every night after dinner we go on a walk. Our neighbors that are about a half a mile from us, they have horses. One of those horses is pregnant, due any day so we've been going and checking on the horse. It's been a really interesting reset in a lot of ways. And so I think if you can take that mindset of saying, "Okay, we're here, whether I like it or not, we're here. So how do I hit the reset button?" I love getting out of the comparison game. Like that's such a dangerous trap to be in in a lot of cases. And how do I make myself better, get in the best shape of my life? Get my head right, be ready to really excel once things are turned back on.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And I would say that now versus two months ago, there are still an equal number of things that are good and are bad.

Brett:

100%.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

It's just which ones you're looking at. The only thing that hasn't changed is the things that you were looking at as good have shifted and now they're somewhere else. And most of the world is just waiting for them to come back and Brett I don't think they're coming. I don't think a lot of them are coming back. I don't-

Brett:

Yeah. Yeah, there's going to be a new normal for sure.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I think we just move forward in a different direction and that is not good or bad, it is just the way of the world.

Brett:

Yeah. Yeah. Really, really powerful. So let's talk specifically e-commerce. So you're an investor now, you built a company had an eight figure exit. You're now advising and you got on your back room and you're talking to smart entrepreneurs all the time. How has this pandemic, this event, how has it shifted your thinking towards the e-commerce, your outlook for e-commerce or has it shifted it?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah. So I mean from a big landscape point of view, I think what has happened is we're now officially going to digitize everything. Like all businesses that you used to go to the store to get, we're now proving that you don't have to. Now full disclosure, I love to go grocery shopping. Like right now, one of the projects I'm working on is a food company. It's a baking company. I love to browse the baking aisle and get new ideas. When I was in the supplement business, I used to love to look at the supplement lines. I love to go shopping. But we've proven that you don't have to go shopping anymore, right? I mean, Instacart is having its heyday right now. You might have delivery services that become fortune 500 companies.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

So we are now proving that you can digitize anything that you thought you couldn't in the past and that trend is going to continue. We're going to continue going down that path. I also love to go to Barnes & Noble. I have a feeling they're not going to exist after all of this plays out. So I think we are seeing an acceleration of what we've seen for the past five to 10 years, which is that big brands are giving way to small micro brands that address very specific problems for very specific groups of people. So you asked about my kind of view as an investor or as an advisor. I have someone right now who I'm coaching and we might get to the point where he talks about an investment, we'll see. But I just, I love this student's approach where she has this fairly small blog and her market is breastfeeding moms with kids that have skin issues.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

You couldn't get more micro than that, right? So her product is very specifically targeted to that group. And because of that, it's formulated specifically for that group. So whereas most people might look at that space and say, "That's a crowded space. The supplement space or the probiotic space, you can get a probiotic for nine bucks on Amazon." This is so specific to that market that she can charge three to five times the price of her competitors. And it'd be worth it because it's made to address a specific problem. But because she has an audience that is specific to that group, she can charge a higher price. She has a bigger moat in that audience and in that space and she has a more predictable launch plan for that.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Those are the types of entrepreneurs that I love to back and those are the types of businesses that I think are going to succeed no matter what happens over the next one to three years in the economy or in the world. If you have a very specific audience that you can speak to and speak their language, I think we're going to be just fine and a lot of entrepreneurs are going to wake up to the fact, especially in the e-commerce world, that the game has to be more about speaking to customers and consumers rather than figuring out what the next thing is that you're going to sell.

Brett:

Interesting. I love that. And it's so interesting that e-commerce has been growing at about 15% globally, year over year for the last however many years forever. But I think this condensed window of a couple months has accelerated that growth big time. And people that were not used to getting their groceries delivered, ordering their groceries online, buying breastfeeding equipment online, like whatever the case may be or supplements, that they're doing that now like never before. And what's interesting, reading some articles about how people buy things in a recession and how to market in a recession.

Brett:

We just did a webinar about seven ways to market in a crisis. And one of the things that we found is that people are open to new things more in times of uncertainty or in a recession than at other times. Right now, even people that are not impacted financially, they're open to new things because they have to be. Like I can't just go to the store and get this thing that I always got. So I'm open to you. I'm open to you marketer or e-commerce company. Tell me your story. And so it really is an opportunity for us I think if we capture it and approach it the right way.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah. I think we're going to see more brands move into call it advertising on Facebook and Instagram because I think they're going to have to because they don't have shelf space anymore. But I think those big brands are going to struggle to communicate exactly to that target audience. . Right, right. And so I think we do have an advantage and an opportunity to move quickly right now. And if you can speak to a very specific target market, I think you are in just an absolute perfect time to be an e-commerce entrepreneur right now.

Brett:

Absolutely. Yeah. And just a quick thought on ads right now. We focus a lot on the Google ads ecosystem and Amazon ads, but Google ads are kind of on sale right now. Like YouTube, we're seeing YouTube costs 20 to 50% less depending on the audience and stuff right now, will last forever. Costs will continue to go up, like that's a certainty. But when you can combine the fact that hey as smaller e-commerce entrepreneurs, we know how to connect with people and ad costs are lower, now is a pretty good time.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, it's amazing. And I'll throw into that influencers I think are on sale too. You have fewer brand sponsorships, you have fewer-

Brett:

And they've got time. What are they doing right now? Sure, send me your product, I'll create a video this evening.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Right, right. And so man, I really do think you have to be a little bit scrappy right now, but I think that if you're willing to be scrappy and you just said something really important. You said it's fun though.

Brett:

It is. It is.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Some people would disagree with you because a lot of ... we've had such a heyday in the e-commerce world that a lot of the entrepreneurs succeeded in businesses that they don't really like. They just were pursuing the money or the results. And that's fine. Like I mean I started my first business for the money too, but at some point that has a ceiling until you really like what you're doing or you like your customer. And we're in a very interesting window right now where you could make the pivot to rolling out a business that you enjoy a lot more than the thing that you're just doing for money and that opens up a new kind of gear for you to do the scrappy things to get ahead. Doing what you like is actually a really sweet unlock to growing something even bigger than what you're doing right now.

Brett:

Yeah, absolutely. And I think it's one of those things, I heard a quote from Stephen King years ago where he's like, "I love where I'm at." I'm paraphrasing here, but I miss the hungry days. Like I miss the days when I was like scrapping and trying to figure things out and fighting to get ... And most of us probably aren't at that point where we're like billionaire or whatever. But I think there's something to be said about when we have to shift gears and get into that scrappy mode and kind of get after a little bit. It should awaken something in you and that's for me anyway. I love what I do. I've always loved what I've done in this space, but scrapping is kind of fun.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

It is when you enjoy what is unfolding for you. So I was just playing with this thought earlier today Brett. This isn't fully flushed out, so you're getting the raw files. Forgive me. But I was thinking about how things like everything is about to be free. Go with me for a second. Like money right now, 0% interest rates, money's free.

Brett:

Or forgiven if you get the particular part of the cares act forgiven.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Oil is free. Gasoline, cheapest in history. It's basically free. Air travel about to be the cheapest in history. Basically free. Anything that you want is about to be basically free so we don't have to do anything for money anymore. If you think about this, pretty much the whole world has opened up, prices are about to come crashing down. Starting a business Brett, basically free. You can kick start whatever you want, get pre orders, place the inventory order and fulfill. I mean like advertising this podcast, free. Almost everything that you want is actually can be done free. So you might as well just do what you want because the whole world is getting to the point. And I don't mean to be crass, I know there's ... I think there's more mental financial stress than there is actual financial stress. Like people worry about what's going to happen while they are eating a full meal on their cell phone. And I get, like I've been there, right? When the stock market fell from 30,000 to 18,000, I had those moments of fear of what am I going to do? I need to make more money.

Brett:

All going away. Yup.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I had it too and I got lots of money. So I understand like the mental game that happens. And I don't mean to be crass, I just mean that anything that you really want to do, you can basically do for less than it has ever cost in real dollars in history and that trend is continuing. We have more abundance than ever before. So you might as well just do what you want because we just got to the point where like we've all kind of won. If you're safe and you're healthy and you don't have to go anywhere in quarantine, this is a really good time to dream. It's a really good time to be like, what do I want? Because like when life moves forward, we can do anything. And prices are going to be cheap and there's going to be lots of mobility and we can do whatever we want. So we might as well just build businesses that we like and that we get really jizzer jazzered up about.

Brett:

Yeah. And I love that you're saying it's free. I think that that adds some drama too and it opens up your eyes a little bit. I think another way to frame it as like, it's accessible, right? You can get these things, gas, air travel, business, like it's accessible and potentially getting there is easier than it's ever been before, which is really cool. So awesome. I want to kind of paint two different scenarios and I want to pick the brain of Ryan and see what you would advise for an e-commerce company in these two scenarios. And your advice may be almost identical for both. If it is, it's fine. So really seeing two groups of e-commerce companies.

Brett:

The majority of the e-commerce companies we work with and talk to are actually doing quite well right now. Yeah. In fact, so we built these, a member of my team built these COVID-19 dashboards where I can quickly go in and look at all of our clients day over day, week over week, month over month and year over year, global sales, sales from Google ads, things like that and then kind of do a comparison. At the beginning, like one weekend to this, we still had 67% of our clients were up at least year over year and month over month. Okay.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Amazing.

Brett:

I just looked this morning, so I went through all accounts. We serve about 80 accounts. 75% are up right now.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

That's great.

Brett:

And like another 5% are flat. There's a few that are like plus or minus 2%. There are some that are down though. And I'll talk to you about the categories we're seeing that are down. This may or may not be global to back this up. But apparel is down in some cases, like accessories, watches, things like that are down a little bit. We're seeing some luxury items. I have a client that sells luxury bedding, like really high end bedding although they just had a major turner. Like they got hit hard at the beginning of this, but the last April's been great.

Brett:

Anyway, so let's first take an e-commerce company that's kind of had a rough go of it. Like they're not doing so well in this COVID-19 world and maybe they're hearing from their friends or I think that the CEO of Shopify just said it's like Christmas everyday right now. And this entrepreneur is saying, "Well not for me. Like I'm not there." So what advice would you give to the struggling e-commerce brand? What should they be thinking about doing now? And then also what should they be doing as we come out of this and whatever the new normal looks like?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

So this is going to be a little bit counterintuitive. If you are not performing the way that you would like to be performing, I'd be willing to bet money, nine bucks I'll bet that you are thinking too big. Now that's counterintuitive because most people say you need to think bigger. You need to go harder, you need to move faster. I think you are overlooking all of your opportunities because you're comparing yourself to the people that you perceive to be doing bigger things. It does not take a lot of people to build a really wildly successful profitable business. You do not need a million customers to do damage. You need a few people who really give a crap.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

So the way that you can pivot from stagnant growth or from a reduction in sales to growth again is to go all in on the people who are giving a crap and go get more of them. What most people do is they ignore all of the good news that they're getting from their customers and they look for the problems and so they find more of them. And so they up being in this endless loop of trying to fix things that are broken rather than serving and going and get more people that they want to serve. So if you go after the people that are really happy, after the people who need exactly what you've got, and you communicate them in a way that they're used to being communicated to, you'll have a new audience in 90 days.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

So a lot of people and I've experienced this myself where you kind of overlook the hundred people that are showing up because you see somebody else has a thousand or a million. But if you just go all in on those hundred, like I tell people when they're launching a new business, if you can get a hundred people, a hundred people really excited to the point where they will post about you on social media and they will review your product on Amazon and they'll go on auto ship on your Shopify store and they'll subscribe on YouTube and share your videos. 100 of those people who care, you can build a six or seven figure business with those hundred people. And so I think that the entrepreneur is thinking beyond where they are and they're beating themselves up for where they're not rather than maximizing where they are. But that's the route that they have to go through if they want to get back to growth.

Brett:

Yeah, I love that. And one of the other things we're seeing, talking about maybe you're thinking too big or you're thinking beyond what you need to focus on. Sometimes we think, hey, I need some kind of complex funnel or I need some kind of new whizzbang thing when really maybe what you need to do is just put up some solid Google search ads or some shopping ads. Like get some of those now buyers, put out great content like you're talking about, connect with people, like do some really simple things. Very simple things right now are having a pretty high return.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah. I mean, the way I like to look at it is just celebrate and highlight whatever you want more of. So if somebody leaves you a five star review on Amazon, screenshot that, post it on social media, responded to them publicly, and then send them a gift basket and watch them respond publicly to you and watch how many other people are like, "Well shoot, they're doing that for a five star review. I'll feel kind of bad that I haven't reviewed this guy." Or if you just email your list and say thank you. I haven't reached out in a while and we're a small business. I just want to say thank you. I know there's a lot of people that could have your attention and you gave five minutes of it to us and I just appreciate it. Thank you. The more you appreciate what you want more of, it appreciates. You get more of it. So turn your attention away from where you are not and put it towards what you want more of and you will get more of it.

Brett:

Yeah, that's awesome. Super powerful. So, okay. Let's flip it now. So let's look at ... and I don't know what the global numbers are, but for our client base, 75% are up right now. Like maybe they even feel bad that they're ... There's the news that people are being laid off and the restaurant industry is being decimated and things like that and they're like, "Whoa, I just have like a record month." So what about the e-commerce brand is doing really well right now? Any advice, any things you'd tell them, "Hey, don't get loads of sleep here," or just any words of advice for those that are doing well right now?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

For the brand that is doing really well, don't overlook the people that are making it possible for you to do really well. So you're doing something well, great. Keep doing it and double down on your appreciation for your customers. Double down on your appreciation for your best team members because I'm trying to see how to word this. We're all a little bit on eggshells because we're all a little bit ... we can all be sucker punched right now. So you'd better be extra thankful for the people who are spending the most money with you and the people who are most contributing to your success. And they should be more appreciative to you too. We're all having to step up a little bit more. So don't get soft on the people that are making it possible for you to be continuing to kill it.

Brett:

I love that advice. I actually just did an interview with a guy named David Wax and he's got a service to help you create handwritten notes. And it was just such a ... it was interesting to me because I've been kind of a marketing junkie since the early two thousands and I was a Jay Abraham fan and Dan Kennedy's fan and like looked at hand addressed mail and lumpy mail and things like that. But hearing him talk and then actually a friend of mine owns a jewelry store and I've helped them with their marketing for over a decade now. I bought something recently and he sent me a handwritten note and it had a couple of lines in it. And this is something I was just reminded, they do this with everybody. Everybody.

Brett:

They'll send a handwritten note, it'll have like a couple little nuggets in there. It's not just like, hey, thanks for purchasing. I really appreciate it, blah blah blah. It's like, hey, I really hope Britney enjoyed this because she made this comment. Like there's something personal in it, but that if I didn't already love the guy and love the company, I would now. I think there's some pieces of that that e-commerce companies could do too. Why not take an hour a day in the evening now when you're in lockdown and write a handwritten thank you note to some of your best customers and make it personal and put some meaning in it. I think that would be a huge, probably a huge return on time. So yeah, I love that.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah. I think too many people try to scale before they do the grunt work at the beginning and that allows them to scale. Or said differently, I think too many people are worried about growth rather than they are about those beginning stages when they're kind of setting the landscape. And when you're at the ... especially at the beginning, going all in on the people who actually care just completely changes the trajectory of your business. I mean this is a reason why people say that your network is your net worth. It's because the people that are surrounded, those are all ... that surround you, those are your opportunities. And it takes one person to have the right audience or the right investor or the right connection or the right idea that changes everything. But people are so focused on what they're going to get out of the transaction that they ignore the kind of stuff you're talking about ..

Brett:

Love it. So I love that you've kind of transitioned to you're an investor, you're an advisor, you're doing all kinds of fun things right now. It's always interesting to hear from an advisor or an investor's perspective, what do you look for in an e-commerce company? So if you're going to invest your money or your funds money into an e-commerce store, what are you looking for? And the reason I asked that is because I think there are some clues there even for somebody that doesn't want to sell. Like someone that just wants to keep their business, they don't want investors, whatever. There's a lesson there on here's what makes for a real business. Here's what makes a successful business. So what do you look for?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, there's two things right off the bat. The first is I am looking at the mindset of the entrepreneur. The number one, no question. You are betting on the jockey. You are betting on the person when you make an investment 100% because we have all had great ideas that sucked. We've all had them. And so you are betting on the person who is leading the ship and I am evaluating how excited are they about the process? How excited are they to build the product line? How excited are they about the mission and the story? I am not looking at projections. I am not looking at market size. I am not looking at the entrepreneurs saying how much money they're going to make. That's a turn off to me. Not because I don't like money. My company is capitalism.com I really like money. I am looking at it because the most profitable bet is on the person who is going to be operating in the service of other people. So that's the first thing I'm looking for. The next thing I'm looking for, number two, the best marketing in the world is a great fricking product.

Brett:

It's so true. It's so true. invested in marketing for years. Yeah.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

You said like you kind of quipped that somebody thinks I need like a great complex funnel and no you don't. Most billion dollar companies don't have complex funnels. They have great fricking products. And so I'm looking at what does the customer say about the buying experience and the product? What does the market say they want? How are people coming back and buying more of it? So ideas are crap. The person who is in charge and the excitedness of the customer, those are the things that matter right off the bat. If those two things pass, then we can talk business.

Brett:

Nice. Yeah, I like that. So you're looking for, does this entrepreneur have the passion, which that's maybe an overused or poorly used word, but do they love this, do they have resilience or do they have tenacity. I love your interview recently that you did on your podcast with Moiz Ali, the founder of Native Deodorant. And he talks about this too. And actually, he's got a new podcast coming out, which I don't remember the name of, but I'll link to it-

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Called Exit Strategy.

Brett:

Exit Strategy. Yeah. So Moiz, mutual friend. We actually, a client of ours as well, full disclosure. But I love their product. But Moiz like embodies and he even says like you don't have to do it the way he did it of course, but he embodies like this amazing resilient entrepreneur. So you're looking for that but is there-

Ryan Daniel Moran:

But just to piggyback on that Brett, Moiz is chapter four in my new book.

Brett:

Is that right? Okay.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And so I open with the story of Moiz taking a stick of Native Deodorant and rubbing it on his shirt because he was in iteration mode on his product of how do we make this better? How do we make this better? How do we make this better? And that's the type of entrepreneur that has a shot. Most people, and this is, I get taken to the cleaners in the Amazon circles because people ask me like, "When you're browsing for a product on helium 10 in Jungle Scout, what do you look at?" I'm like, "I don't use it any data to tell me what product my customers want. I can look at it from market size and those tools can be really helpful for making final decisions."

Ryan Daniel Moran:

But so to try and decide what business you're going to be in based on market data is usually a sign that somebody is in it to extract money from the market rather than to create something that is unique and different for a specific group of people. One of those is a lifestyle business that you can manage and be fine, be a full time entrepreneur and worry about money a lot. The other is to be a brand that can be scaled and sold. And I like to bet on entrepreneurs who are willing to build brands.

Brett:

Awesome. And just to kind of fill out that story a little bit so that you'll go buy the book. And so you'll listen to Moiz's podcast. Started Native Deodorant in his kitchen, within two years time, was it right about two years sold to P&G for $120 million?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

He started with $500 and 18 months later he had an offer on the table.

Brett:

Insane. It's insane. So check out his podcast, check out Ryan's book and get more of the scoop. So now let me ask you this, because I love where you're coming from. I love the mindset of like you got a bet on the jockey, you have to understand the entrepreneur. But I also like data and I get the sense of you like data too because you've been very successful. Are there any data points you look at that tell you this is a successful entrepreneur. They have what it takes to be successful or is this more gut, more perception? How do you evaluate that?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Are you talking about in the context of investing in someone?

Brett:

Yes.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Well one of the pieces of data that I'm looking at is like in the investment world we would call it return on invested capital, but it's not that fancy sounding when I'm actually looking at it. Because I'm more looking at it as is this person a good steward of the money that I'm about to give them? And have they proven that by being willing to spend a dollar and make a dollar back and consider it a win? So I'm looking at how aggressively they can acquire and are willing to acquire customers. So that's a data point that I'll look at. Is somebody willing to make the YouTube video, to run the YouTube ad, to spend in the red in the shorter term on Amazon, to go spend the money to build the audience, to create the relationships with influencers and advisors? Or are they holding onto it with this mindset of it's 100% pie. I'm going to keep as much of the pie as possible, and that's my baby.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I run from those entrepreneurs. I run from them. And it's because if you don't believe that an outside relationship is going to make the pie bigger, then you don't get how capitalism works. Capitalism works by you and me coming together and creating new value that did not exist before. But most entrepreneurs are instead looking at it as there's this fixed pie and I'm going to carve out a little slice and I'm going to hold onto as much of it as possible. That's an entrepreneur who was going to plateau and I can't invest in that person. So if you're willing to make the pie bigger by showing that you're willing to acquire customers, even going to the red to acquire customers because you're so confident that your business has the runway to be able to make up for the loss in the longterm. If you haven't proven that, then I'm not sure you're ready to take on my money.

Brett:

Yeah. Growth mindset versus a scarcity mindset in a lot of ways that if I'm giving you something, then I lose it rather than we can all win.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

That's right.

Brett:

Totally makes sense. We'd love to get your perspective on this because this has been another interesting thing for me. Right? So we've made some good decisions I think with OMG Commerce and we've made some dumb decisions too. But I've been thinking about like, what do I invest in? What do I do right now? Because it was such a flip in mindset for me several years ago when I heard Mayford Garrett Gunderson who was on your podcast. I also heard Gary Vee and a few other people talking about, well now we're just waiting for the next recession because that's when there's going to be opportunities. That's when things are going to go on sale. There's going to be discounts. We're going to invest. A lot of money was made in the great depression as an example. So it was a difficult time obviously. I was not alive then. My kids like to make jokes. Like I was on that battle although I'm 40 years old. But so lots of opportunities here.

Brett:

I think though, going back to some points I made in the beginning, there could be some people that are saying like, I don't know what to do. Like do I go buy stocks now, do I invest in this company now? There's this fear of maybe I'm going to miss a golden opportunity in the midst of this. So how are you approaching investing right now? What advice would you give to the investor who's kind of sitting on the sidelines right now trying to wonder what the-

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah. So I mean full disclosure, I'm an idiot on the internet who just enjoys talking about this stuff. So don't listen to anything that I say.

Brett:

This is not investment advice. Just don't give investment advice.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Just don't listen to anything that I say. I'm an idiot on the internet. That's the disclaimer. And I'm like, I covered everything. I'm a moron. And my last name is Moran. All right. Don't listen to anything that I have to say. But in terms of investing, if you listen to the smartest investors in the world, there's one thing that all of them say consistently, invest in what you understand. It is the same thing in business. Do not start a business that you do not have a strategic advantage in. Do not start a business that you don't know something more than the other person. Do not start a business where you don't know more about your customer, more about the marketplace or at least believe in something so much that you're willing to put your blood, sweat and tears into it. Do not do that. And the same is true in investing. In investing, invest in the companies that you know something about because that is how marketplaces price things.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

So the price is not like some illusory thing that is outside of people. It's people's perception. And so if you know something early on like how many of us were shopping on Amazon before the rest of the world? Most of us. How many people were using Zoom before the rest of the world? Most of us. How many people are buying Bitcoin knowing that there is no utility to it right now? A lot of people, and those are speculators who are hoping that it's going to go up in value. Now you get a pass if you're actually buying things in Bitcoin and you can see where it's being utilized. But that is like 1%.

Brett:

Yeah, it's like I don't think I know anybody that's doing that but it's like maybe.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

So there's no utility there. So the only reason you would buy it is because you think it's going to go up in value. And that is how most people are approaching stocks and investing. I hope this goes up in value. In reality, you're looking at companies and sectors that you know something about and you can make like a voluntary bet on it doing well versus trying to just price time things and buy low and hope that it goes up. I don't think-

Brett:

Catch the falling knife so to speak, like it's impossible to time the market. The smartest people in the world can't do it.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I mean now to my own credit, I came out publicly to my list and I said, "Look, the dollar is probably going to break down to 22,000, then 20,000, then 18,000. Well bounce from 18,000, go back up to 24 and then we're going to go right back down to 20." And that has like happened almost exactly. So like from a marketplace perspective, like we nailed it at capitalism.com. However, the strategy with how you respond to that doesn't change that much. It's by good companies that you believe in at good prices. And the only thing that-

Brett:

That you understand when there's a value there. You understand when it's on sale.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Correct. So the only thing that knowing what the market will do or might do, the only that's going to tell you is how the broad market is responding to all of the news. It should not affect your decision to evaluate a good company. The only way that you can respond, even when the market goes from 30,000 to 20,000, the only proper way to respond is getting out ahead of that. Knowing what your shopping list of businesses are before there is a big event because otherwise you have no way to properly price that business. So we're getting into like mumbo jumbo here. Here's a real takeaway. The business you know most about is your own. And so your dollars are best deployed in your own business. I recommend not ... sorry, I shouldn't say recommend in the context of investing.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I take 10% of take home money and put that into the market. And I put that into companies that I like, that pay a dividend or that I know a lot about, and that's my longterm investment strategy. Everything else goes into companies I know really well, which usually come from my own network and or that I own a piece of. That to me is the smartest thing that you can do.

Brett:

Nice.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And actually, let's just look at this conversation we've had. We've talked about YouTube ads are on sale right now. Influencers are on sale right now. Guess what Brett, that's investing.

Brett:

It is investing. It is. Investing-

Ryan Daniel Moran:

By underpricing assets and reselling stuff. That's investing and guess what? We have a strategic advantage knowing that that's the case. That's where we should put our dollars. And you know what might happen next is that Google might report lower revenue because prices are down and then we'll go, "That's not going to last. Maybe it's time to buy Google."

Brett:

Yeah. Buy some google stock.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

That's smart investing. Not is the market going to go up or is going to go down? That's a fool's game.

Brett:

Yeah, I got this stock tip from my neighbor. He said this is a can't lose stock over here. But I love that. I think that's something that a lot of people aren't thinking about is you know your business, you know traffic, you know whatever, like invest in it when it's on sale. Like that's, if YouTube ads are down in cost 20 to 50%, and you know what you're doing, you have a good offer and a good ad and all that, you just made 20% on your money, like what you would have had otherwise. Right. That's a pretty good-

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, and that's a good ROI.

Brett:

That's good ROI. Yeah. Even if nothing else changes, that's pretty good ROI.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

That's right.

Brett:

That's fantastic. Let's talk a little bit about the stuff you got going on and how people can kind of get involved. So first of all, let's talk about the capitalism conference. Why did you do that? And is there any, and I don't mean to put you on the spot, but is there plans on that's going to happen at some point in the future? Any ideas when?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, so it's so funny you should ask Brett. So you asked about the story of the capitalism conference. It's kind of an embarrassing story. A few years ago I used to fall asleep to this thought. This was like I think I had just moved to Austin. So like 2013 I used to have this thought. I used to ask myself, what's the biggest strategic risk I could take right now that if it paid off would change my life? And that was how I would approach business when I was like in my mid 20s.

Brett:

That's a bold thought, man. Yeah.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And so I ran the numbers on an event and I discovered that it would basically require most, if not all of my retained earnings that I had up until that point. And so I said, "Okay, it'll cost that much, but I'll sell tickets. I know I'll sell some. So if I can sell some, I can offset the cost so it won't be a total loss." So I had about half a million dollars in retained earnings and I bet them, and my thought was-

Brett:

This is also probably not investment advice.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

This is not investment advice.

Brett:

Don't put all your money in a new event you're creating. But yeah.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Probably not especially right now Brett. But the thought to me was, you know what? I don't feel like I'm on the path that is going to bring me the most growth and fulfillment. So the only way I know how to hack that is to surround myself with people who are on the path that I want to be on. And so I booked right out of the gate. I paid them their crazy speaking fees. Gary Vaynerchuk, Grant Cardone-

Brett:

Dude, that's paid off because you and Gary Vee like hanging out. So I mean like that's become a relationship. Yeah.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

He wrote the endorsement on the top of my book that I'm very proud of.

Brett:

That's awesome.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Grant Cardone ended up being a great story because I thought he was a real d bag and Robert Herjavec was-

Brett:

I think there may be a decent number of people that think that. Yeah.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Oh, I've got stories Brett. But basically what happened was I basically put half a million dollars into building my network. And I was like, and I'll sell tickets and we'll see who shows up. That was the first cap con back in like 2014 or 15. And this year obviously didn't happen and we'll bring it back. We'll have cap con five. I don't know when that will be, but what we just announced, we just announced, I do a membership called the 1%. We just announced that cap con is basically going to be rolled into membership. So our members, all of their membership dues are just going to be credits for cap con and cap con's going to end up being our Superbowl. So I'm really excited about it. I don't know when it's going to happen. But we're really pumped about it.

Brett:

Cool. All links to everything is capitalism.com. Check it out and then you can be informed then when that does go live. Let's talk a little bit about the 1% and what you guys are doing there and who might be a good fit for that. And then I want to talk about your book.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Okay, cool. I mean, you know what's funny is this is me really letting my hair down with you Brett. I'm just going to hanging out for a second.

Brett:

All right. I like it.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Have you ever noticed in your business that the things that are really hard and that you think are going to be amazing don't work out as highly as like the things that are really easy and you're like, "That's too easy. That's not going to work."

Brett:

Yup. Yup.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I just had this with the 1% where like we have, we put all our trainings in there, like tens of thousands of dollars worth of training and you want to make the most amazing can't say no offer except for the fact that no one wants more training. And then just recently we started doing this thing, we just call it like Sunday Capitalism Coffee. Like we all get together and we get on a, like we do a live and we just like somebody has an ask of the community, we bring them on live and they're like, "Look I'm really struggling with this piece. Does anybody know an investor?" And then the whole group will come in and comment and open their network. Right. And so it's just like a Sunday coffee mastermind. Was just something that I threw together because I wanted to just hang out more with my community. Huge success.

Brett:

Takes no preparation, takes no, you're not yet creating courses or anything.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Exactly. Right. So it's a community of capitalists and I mean really our bread and butter is build a business and invest the profits. That's the content we create. Those are the courses that we put in there. That's who we surround ourselves with at the event. And it's all rolled into our membership called the 1%. So it's funny because it's kind of been ... You asked me right now where we're kind of in transition of like all the stuff that we thought was going to be so hard and so valuable are the things no one pays attention to. And the things that are so easy, like creating, for me anyway, creating community for entrepreneurs and serving one another and opening our network for one another and investing in one another. And there was somebody who was like, "Hey, this is my idea. What do you think of it?" And other people were commenting like, I want one, I want one. I'll pre order. And so it's a community for capitalists and it's a community that opens up its network and its resources to help people build businesses and invest the profits.

Brett:

Yup. That's fantastic. And one thing I will say, you have a skillset for building community. Like you're naturally good at that. You're good with people, you communicate well, you're perceptive, like obviously so that plays into it. But I think the concept you just shared is true with everybody. Like the thing, probably the thing that comes the most natural and the easiest to you may also lead to the biggest wins in some cases.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah. And it's taken me 32 years to learn that, that we're all unique in some way and our uniqueness is our greatest value. Now, one of the hard things for entrepreneurs, especially internet entrepreneurs at least in my experience has been that we perceive other people's big wins as the thing that we need to mimic in order to have success. But the thing that stands out to me is like my favorite baseball player of all time is named Kenny Lofton. My biggest hall of fame snub in history, like he should-

Brett:

Is that because he played for the Indians or are you just, you're just a fan?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Well, he was an electrifying player.

Brett:

I've heard the name, I'm not a huge baseball guy, but I've heard the name.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

People might argue like the question is legitimate of am I an Indians fan because of Kenny Lofton or am I a Kenny Lofton fan because of the Indians? An electrifying player. Right. And he was a speedster and a defender and he hit a lot of singles. Well at the same time there was a player on the team named Albert Bell, biggest power hitter of the era-

Brett:

Yeah. Yeah. Know that name.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Had Kenny Lofton tried to be a power hitter like Albert Bell, he would've sucked. And yet in like the entrepreneurial world, there's a lot of Kenny Loftons who are trying to be Albert Bells. They're building businesses mimicking everybody else's funnel, everyone else's ads, everyone else's advertising strategy, everyone else's product. And the fact of the matter is you're trying to mimic someone else's game and they've already got it. And so it's taken me 32 years I think to really realize that what is naturally easily and motivating and exciting and fun for me is my greatest gift to the people around me. Do you have any idea how much fun I've had in the last hour? I will walk out of this interview with more energy than when I started. I am so proud of the book I wrote because it's me just bleeding on the paper and analyzing every word and loving every minute of it.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And so it's going to be really easy for me to sell it because I'm going to look someone in the face and be like, "You want to start a business? If you want to hit $1 million, this is the book. Go read it. It's the best thing you ..." And I will have no conflict of like should they really do it? It's like, no, go read the book. You're an idiot if you don't read the book. And I've had the experience in the past where I've had products that I didn't feel that way about. And guess what happens? You overthink the copy and you analyze every little thing and it takes you forever to build that funnel. Whereas if you just did what was naturally easily motivating to you, the whole world would open up to you. So this is the lesson I'm learning in my career right now Brett.

Brett:

I love it. So one final thought and then I want to get into the book and the details there. I think there's something, there's this interesting balance and this challenge of saying, "Hey, I'm going to look at the Albert Bells or I'm going to look at these successful entrepreneurs. I'm going to look at the Ryan Daniel Morans of the world and say, 'Okay, there are clues in their success, right? Success leaves clues. So I want to learn from those clues, but I can't become Ryan. I'm not Ryan. I've got to be me. Right? So I've got to be Kenny Lofton not Albert Bell.'" Any tips or tricks there or is it just a matter of getting that mind right?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yes. Your emotions are the guide to that. That sounds woo-woo airy fairy weirdo at first, but hear me out. Your emotions are a really good sign of what you really want. Does it excite you or does it make you contract? So like we're all really driven by our emotions. Mark Manson wrote the book, Everything Is F'd and he also wrote The Subtle Art. But I really liked his follow up book, which is called Everything Is F'd. And in it he talks about the thinking brain and the feeling brain and how they're both in the car but the feeling brain is the one with its hands on the wheel. And the thinking brain is navigating saying, I think we should go this way. But the thinking brain cannot make the hands on the wheel move in a different direction. The thinking brain is subservient to the feeling brain.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Now we all, especially in the West, prioritize the thinking brain because it's rational and it's reasonable, but it ain't driving the car. We cannot out-think our emotions. Our emotions have their hand on the wheel. And it is deciding where it's going, when it's hungry, when it's angry, when it wants something, it finds ways to get it. And the thinking brain has to sit there and go, okay, I got to find a new map. And so our emotions, when we're happy, when we're excited, when we're relaxed, when we feel loving, when we feel giving, when we feel energized, when we feel at ease, when we feel playful, when we feel excited, those are all in line with the things that we want. We feel those ways because we're thinking about and practicing the things that we really want.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And when we're not giving the feeling brain what we really want, when we're stressed, when we're thinking about money, when we're trying to predict the future, when we're thinking about strategy in a way that gets the results, not the way that makes us excited, we are now robbing our emotions of what they really want. So the way that really unlock your superpower is to pay attention to the way things make you feel rather than the strategy that is going to get you there. Man, I had to beat my head against the wall enough times to finally realize that the wall wasn't moving. I was just going to walk around it and it's led me to this conclusion. I am not smarter than my emotions.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

So I do stupid things when my emotions are out of whack. And so if I'm good with my emotions, then I'm really a clear thinker and I really get a lot of good things done. But when I'm afraid, when I am nervous, when I feel out of integrity, man I cannot think my way to success. And so finding out who we really are and what really drives us is a matter of tuning into our emotional abilities, not our mental IQ.

Brett:

Dude, that's good. That's really good. I'm going to check that book out. Deep stuff. But now let's talk about your book. So let me tell me why I would be an idiot not to buy your book, which I believe that I would be.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Because it is the playbook to building a business to seven figures in a way that is scalable and sellable, in a way to do it with minimal startup capital, almost no risk, and in a way that is predictable and has been proven over hundreds and hundreds of entrepreneurs with case studies that make it fun enough for you to breeze through it. So in my career-

Brett:

And I'm assuming your writing style is like your speaking style, because this is like, this is very digestible, entertaining, fun, high energy. So do you write in similar fashion?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, my editor took out some of the curse words but yes. So-

Brett:

Yeah, you want to ... for those that are watching the video, you want to.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. So this is 12 months To 1 million, quote by Gary Vaynerchuk up top, foreword by Russell Brunson.

Brett:

Russell Brunson. Yeah. Which I was actually thinking of Russell Brunson's a friend. We actually did a project together in 2009 called DCS local. I felt this need to like shout out to Russell. I know we were talking negatively about complex funnels. Click funnels is still great. Russell Brunson is still great. You still may be one funnel away from something. Anyway, guys I'm just throwing that out there.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I use click funnels too. So my strategy at capitalism.com has been very simply to help entrepreneurs align those four products that sales 25 sales a day to get to a hundred sales. At a $30 price point, that's $1 million business. So this is kind of the fast lane to getting those four products to 25 sales a day and having $1 million business. It's broken into three stages. Stage one is the grind. The grind is discovering who your target market is, what they buy, deciding what your first product is going to be, coming up with a launch plan, funding the business, those hard decisions that we need to get out of the way as quickly as possible so we can take a darn sale. Stage two I call the growth. It is about getting that product to 25 sales a day and here's how we do it. We do that by stacking the deck and stacking the deck is building up a small seed audience that wants what we've got ready on launch day.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And then going all in on our customers, our reviewers, and the people who are watching our stuff until we're at 25 sales a day. Screenshotting every review, replying to every comment until we're doing the consistent 25 sales a day. Then stage three is called the gold. It's when we repeat that process over three more products. And so we have four products doing 25 sales a day. That's a hundred sales a day. Now, the caveat to this is once you're in stage three, things compound way faster. In my experience, when you launch that second product off the back of something doing 25 sales a day, the first product will also go way up because you have repeat sellers, you have crossover sales, you have upsells, you have word of mouth, you have subscribe and save, you have people on auto ship.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

And so the snowball starts to build. So if you're a new entrepreneur on a new journey, this is going to give you clarity and a roadmap to hitting seven figures. If you are already in business, this is a book that is going to help you build a sustainable business that you can scale and sell. So I know there's a lot of entrepreneurs who are wondering, how do I ... like I've got something that's working but I don't feel like I have something that I can scale and sell. The problem is probably that you don't know who your who is. You're not going all in on that person and you are not doing the things that allow that business to sustain it without you working all the time. So if you're working too much and you don't have a business that you can sell or you want to be more sellable, this is the book that'll give you a seven figure business you can sell.

Brett:

That's awesome. And I'm a firm believer, I know you are too that really the companies that will succeed and win in the coming years are those that build a brand, those that are focused on the customer, those that build a great product. And I'm super excited. I can't wait to dig into the book. So check it out. 12 months To 1 million, also capitalism.com. Go there, check out Ryan's podcast, come to the next event whenever that may be. Ryan, this has been a blast man. I've had so much fun getting to chat with you.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

I had a great time too. Thank you man.

Brett:

Yeah, yeah, I had a lot of fun. Any asks? Anything you want to ask from the audience?

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Well, since you said you asked, I was recording a solo podcast earlier today and I just decided to do like I on the spot while I was recording, I was like, "Hey, here's an idea," and just dropped it on my podcast. So I'm just testing this. I have over at capitalism.com/book, I put together bulk order options for the book. And the one that I put together was the top tier was to fly to Austin and we'll come up with a strategic plan to build a seven figure business for you in a day. And then I'll open up my network to help promote the business and I'll even consider investing in the business. So that's at capitalism.com/book.

Brett:

Quarantine's getting to you man.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, I guess so. So my ask is if you have an audience or if you've been just kicking around the idea of doing this for too long or if you've got a podcast and want to do something cool by your audience, I just decided to put together one of the tiers being that you can come to Austin or we can do it on Zoom if quarantine goes on for the rest of the year and we'll map out the strategic plan to build a seven figure business for you, custom tailored and then I'll consider it opening my network or even my wallet to back the business. So that was the most no brainer offer I could think of to promote.

Brett:

That is super fun. So check it out at capitalism.com/book. Ryan Daniel Moran ladies and gentlemen. Ryan, thanks again man. Would love to do it again some time.

Ryan Daniel Moran:

Yeah, thank you so much for having me. It was great chatting with you all. Thank you.

Brett:

Absolutely. And as always, we appreciate you. We'd love to hear more of what you'd like us to dive into on this podcast. So give us some feedback. Give us a review on iTunes if you're so inclined. And with that, until next time, thank you for listening.

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