Episode 132

The Two Hottest Trends in Amazon Advertising - Sponsored Brand Video and DSP

Chris Tyler - OMG Commerce
August 26, 2020
SUBSCRIBE: iTunesStitcher

Amazon Advertising has exploded in recent years.  In fact, Amazon is now the 3rd largest online advertising platform behind only Facebook and Google.  Pretty impressive for a company who’s a retailer first, cloud computing 2nd, and online advertising 3rd.  

In this episode, I wanted to bring on the sharpest mind in Amazon Advertising that I know - OMG’s very own Chris Tyler.  I brought him on so we could deep dive into the two hottest trends in Amazon Advertising right now - Sponsored Brand Video (formerly Video in Search ads) and Amazon DSP.  Here’s a look at what we cover:

  • What is Amazon DSP and how can sellers use it to reach shoppers on an off Amazon?
  • How to target people actively shopping for your competitor's products who haven’t purchased yet.
  • How Sponsored Brand Video (SBV) ads are outperforming ALL other ad types for most of our clients.
  • 5 keys to a great Sponsored Brand Video Ad
  • How you can test SBV without spending a fortune on video production
  • Plus more!

Free Amazon DSP Roadmap

Free Sponsored Brand Video Success Guide

Guest: Chris Tyler - Director of Amazon at OMG Commerce

Mentioned in this episode:

Amazon Sponsored Brand Video

Animoto

Amazon DSP

Episode Transcript:

Brett Curry:

Well hello, and welcome to another edition of the Ecommerce Evolution Podcast. I'm your host Brett Curry, CEO of OMG Commerce. And I can't wait to deliver today's content. We're talking about the two hottest, most interesting, most compelling new Amazon ad types. And I say new. Relatively new. But we're going to be diving into some things that, if you're selling on Amazon, if you're considering selling on Amazon, if your competitors are on Amazon, you need to be aware of these ad types.

Brett Curry:

This is going to be a deep dive into sponsored brand video, which, if I had to pick favorites, this is my favorite right now, probably because I've always had a little bit of an affinity to video. And we'll talk about the other reasons why I like this so much in a minute. And then Amazon DSP. So Amazon DSP isn't all that new, but it is new to a lot of our clients. And maybe it's new to you listening to this podcast.

Brett Curry:

So we're going to break those down, show you why they're powerful, how to use them, what kind of results we're seeing, and hopefully this will be really useful for you.

Brett Curry:

There's no better guest for me to bring on the show today than the man himself. He is our Amazon Director. This guy is a PPC master. And just a math wizard, and loves this stuff. In fact, I have to ream him in sometimes, because he geeks out about this stuff so much, and he talks above our heads on occasion. But delighted to welcome to the show the OMG Commerce Amazon Director, Chris Tyler.

Chris Tyler:

Doing well man, how about yourself?

Brett Curry:

Yeah. You know, you always say humble things like, "I don't like to be on podcasts," and stuff like that. But you were on a podcast... It's been awhile now, but you crushed it, and so you're back again, man. This is round number two for you on the Ecommerce Evolution Podcast.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. I know you get feedback saying that the past podcast was the most popular. So I'm hoping that this one kind of breaks the bank.

Brett Curry:

So you'd probably have to get into a dispute with Chris Brewer, co-founder of OMG Commerce, because he's been on the podcast a few times. Always does a great job, we have a lot of fun together. But he does like to embellish his stats a little bit, and also highlight the fact that one of his episodes, we did this episode called 10 X-factors of Ecommerce Growth, and he and I did that together. It was one of the most popular shows. But you were up to . I don't actually, I can't confirm that.

Chris Tyler:

You'll have to go back and check.

Brett Curry:

Let's see if I can go back and check, and we'll probably need to get some independent third parties to verify, make sure that no one's cheating on the numbers.

Brett Curry:

But anyway, it was a great show. And really excited to talk about these two aspects of Amazon advertising. Before we do that though, Chris, and I already told your job title. But tell people kind of what you do and talk about the team that you lead here at OMG Commerce, and brag on that team a little bit.

Chris Tyler:

Sure. Absolutely. It's been a pretty awesome journey. So we started the Amazon side at OMG probably four and a half years ago. And it was just me at the time, and figuring out...

Brett Curry:

It was a department of one. You were the Amazon department.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. I was head of the department, and the department.

Brett Curry:

You were the employee, you were the Director, you almost fired yourself a few times.

Chris Tyler:

I won Employee of the Month every month.

Brett Curry:

You kept lobbying for a raise for yourself. It was interesting.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. Absolutely. And so, it kind of was a great journey, but also awesome transition. Several transitions from being a specialist, figuring out PPC, to bringing in a team, being the Director, managing people. And as we've grown as a team, and it's been really awesome who we've brought on and how they've just grown with us, it's been awesome moving to Director in the whole Amazon team growing, where my focus now goes to managing a crack shop team that just excels at PPC and beyond, and then working on things like API development and sponsoring video strategies, DSP growth when there are challenges inherent for, really, every agency right now.

Chris Tyler:

And so, it's just been a move there, and then the team we have has been amazing. We've got people that have been with us for like three plus years. But also bringing people in that have run businesses on Amazon doing. Heading 20 million plus a year has allowed us to start moving from just PPC focus to strategic guidance on operations, product guidance, as well as so many other facets within Amazon.

Chris Tyler:

And so I feel like we're still focused on PPC, but then full growth and full Amazon mindset both on Amazon and off going to it has definitely been a movement for us in the past couple of years, and that's just been super exciting.

Brett Curry:

Yeah. It's been a ton of fun. It's been a ton of fun to observe and watch you grow as a leader, but also watch the Amazon team grow. And hey listen, Amazon, as an advertising platform, is like a rocket ship. It's growing at an incredible pace.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

It's already the number three online ad platform behind Google and Facebook, and this year, ad revenue's going to 12 billion or something like that. Maybe pushing 15 billion. The projections are in the next few years it's going to be north of 20 billion, with a B in ad spend. So it's not going to be long, and Amazon's ad revenue is going to be what Facebook's total revenue was a few years ago. And Facebook is almost all ad revenue. So just the growth of that platform is crazy.

Brett Curry:

Also, the growth of Amazon. When you look at a lockdown, and how so much retail, brick and mortar traffic shifted online. And Amazon grabbed their unfair share of that. Just the way Amazon is evolving, that really means our team, or if you're listening to this, your Amazon team has to be flexible and has to respond quickly to changes. And so it's just been a ton of fun watching the team during a lockdown, as an example, help our clients pivot from FBA to FBM. Fulfilled by Amazon and Fulfilled by Merchant, when Amazon said, "Hey, oops, sorry, you're not an essential, we can't deliver your items now for four weeks," and so we, as a team, rallied, helped our clients get set up with FBM, pulled together third party logistics and all kinds of stuff, and just helped pull that off.

Brett Curry:

But I mentioned on the podcast before, I coach basketball. So I'm a coach. Very much an amateur coach, but I think I can spot a good team. I can spot a team that plays together well, strategizes well, that clicks. And our Amazon team, the Amazon team here at OMG is one that really clicks and gels, and big thanks to you as the leader of that team.

Chris Tyler:

They make me look good.

Brett Curry:

That is true, and that is spoken like a true, a good coach. You give all the credit to the team. Which is true.

Brett Curry:

And so, let's dive in. Let's talk about, first sponsored brand video. And we're going to dive into what it is, how it works, tips, do's and don'ts, and then talk about some results.

Brett Curry:

So I want to kind of talk about what this is. And then I'm actually going to even show a couple of examples that I think will be useful. Or an example that I think will be useful. And so, I'm still always interested. Some of our clients will talk about sponsored brand video, and they'll say, "Oh, no, I've never seen that or heard of it." Likely, as a shopper, you either have encountered this ad, or you will in the very near future. But this ad is, as you're scrolling, this first started on a mobile device, now it's available on desktop.

Brett Curry:

As you're scrolling through the search results for whatever product search you're conducting, you may encounter a video ad. The first iteration, when this ad type was in beta, a fairly closed beta, it was called Video in Search, right? Because it was a video ad in the search results. And then as most good ad platforms do, Google does this all the time, Amazon changed the name to sponsored brand video, which I think is more fitting.

Brett Curry:

And so, let me just show you kind of what this ad looks like. So this is a search for smart home, and as you scroll through here, you'll see that we've got some different smart home devices, but oh, look at that, there's the all new Echo second generation. So for those that are watching, and I'll mute that, but for those that are watching, you'll see that everything is static. We're scrolling through here, we see product images, we see titles, we see prices. All the things that you would expect to see on a search results page.

Brett Curry:

And then all of a sudden, bang. There's a video playing that's just begging for your attention. And so, on this particular video, it's showing kind of the inside of the Echo, and why it works so well, and how it's spying on you. No, I'm just kidding. It shows all the benefits of the Echo. But it shows it in video form.

Brett Curry:

And so it's just super, super powerful. So I'll stop sharing my screen, and now we can just chat again. But Chris, let's talk a little bit. Let's kind of tease some of the results that we're seeing with this ad type, and then we'll get into some of the specifics, because we've really learned what type of video ads work here, how should you think about this, how should you structure it.

Brett Curry:

But what kind of results are we seeing?

Chris Tyler:

First off, amazing. I was looking prior to this call, just to make sure that the stat wouldn't be off, but it's literally 100% of the advertisers that are utilizing it, the return's fantastic.

Brett Curry:

We haven't come up with a single dud yet on this.

Chris Tyler:

No.

Brett Curry:

And if we're being transparent, which we should be, not all of the videos we're running are great. Some of the video ads are like, "That could be better," but testing. We're testing right now.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. And there's always a fine line between quality and quantity, especially with something that's new to market and you'd want to test. The only thing that changes is, really, volume, and then the metrics within that. But the actual return has been great. And what we see is click throughs are honestly 3-10X what they are on sponsored product, and about 2-5 on sponsored brand, if not a little bit higher.

Brett Curry:

So let's just remind people what sponsored products are and sponsored brands are. I know you long time Amazon peeps, you know those inside and out, but sponsored product and sponsored brand. What are they?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. So sponsored product are those sponsored ads you see in search results that look like an organic thing, but they are an ad. And that's what I talk about in this, just within the search results, but they can also go on product pages, beneath the fold. And sponsored brand is a banner ad with the three products, and you put the brand logo, they add a custom image data, which maybe the next podcast we do we can chat on.

Brett Curry:

Look at that, already lobbying. I'll talk to the production team, we'll see. We'll see how this one goes. We'll see how this one goes.

Chris Tyler:

Okay, all right. And a lot of it is above the fold. Sponsored brand can show beneath in a few other places, but the majority is that top banner ad, and that's what most people are familiar with. So that's kind of the high level. We can go in the weeds.

Brett Curry:

That's perfect. And so historically, sponsored products, the listings that are actually ads, but they show up with your organic listings, those have been tried and true.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

Kind of the baseline, the foundation, every Amazon advertiser, they're running sponsored products. And that's usually the highest return. Most efficient. That's where most of the volume is spent.

Chris Tyler:

Mostly spend, yeah.

Brett Curry:

That's where everything is. But comparing sponsored brand video, which shows up really close to sponsored products, how do the two compare?

Chris Tyler:

Sponsored brand video just knocks everything out of the water. And what's really neat, and I'm not sure if it's just a function of being so new that not everyone's leaned into it, and even with the advertisements we work with, there's still several that are not running, and it's because of their own lack of video creation and feeling of, "Hey, this is something you need to do," which, in my opinion, whether it's in house or you get someone to build it, you should be doing videos right after this podcast.

Chris Tyler:

But what's really interesting is that CPC... So often times, CPC's are actually less in sponsored brand and sponsored product. If they're higher, it's only like 10, 15% more. And that just blows my mind, because if you see sponsored brand video in desktop, and it used to be where it would show us at the bottom, when they first rolled it out years ago.

Brett Curry:

I remember that. Like you used to have to scroll all the way to the bottom, next to the... Click on next page. That's where the sponsored brand would be.

Chris Tyler:

And for high search keyword, you're talking 30 rows. And so you were getting volume in, and they've since moved it to where it's like in the middle, or 3rd to 5th row.

Chris Tyler:

When that happened, volume, 5-10X, click through improved, just because that high was in it. And what's cool on desktop is the space, itself, is just out of this world. So it's essentially taking the whole horizontal placement, which is the equivalent of four organic listings or four sponsored product listings. So the idea of getting basically half that space is almost a giant sponsored product listing. And we .. add in an image, kind of like the podcast when we listen.

Brett Curry:

Actually, I have one I can share.

Chris Tyler:

Show it. It's totally worth it.

Brett Curry:

Yep. Yeah. As Chris mentioned, and I kind of eluded to it before, as well, that the sponsored brand video used to only show up mobile, and then Amazon started testing it on desktop. But when they first tested it on desktop, it was at the very bottom. Here's what it kind of looks like now, and I'm not sure if this is a really updated version. I think I grabbed this screenshot pretty recently.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

But as you're scrolling down, like you mentioned, this is maybe three or five listings down, or kind of in the middle of the page thereabout. But again, this is just a static screenshot, but as you scroll, that video is auto-playing. It's auto-playing.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

So you can see it, and this is a smart speaker, and so, it really does capture attention. It's like a sea of color when the rest of the world's black and white. Because everything else is static, and this is moving, and it just really grabs you.

Chris Tyler:

Exactly. And the cool thing is, and you mentioned it, and I think there's more to touch on with that. We have ad companies we're working with that just don't have the ability or content to create really well polished videos.

Brett Curry:

Right. And I wasn't disparaging any of our client's videos or our ability to produce videos, but it's not as easy as just getting a picture. Getting a video put together is a little bit harder and time consuming.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. And so, we started months ago testing them out, and what's really cool, and this may be short term. I know you're very bullish on long term, get great video, because it's going to be more competitive. But I do agree with you. What we're finding is, while click through might be half of what you get from a really well done video, it's filled 2-5X more click through rate than you do with sponsored brand, sponsored product currently.

Chris Tyler:

I think that's an ode to the placement. You just show that, half of it's almost like a giant 2X sponsored product listing, then you have the video. It's got you no matter what the video is. And that's a huge thing. We're still seeing the CDC be lower, A cost B 20-30 percent lower. It's just the click through rate that suffers. But it's fully a win in my mind.

Brett Curry:

Yeah, the click through rate is still better than what we're seeing with other ad types. So it's really great. And I noticed this just recently, we were shopping for a projector to use outside. We built a deck, and we bought a screen, so we're doing outdoor movie nights as a family and stuff like that. And as I was looking for projectors on Amazon, I totally clicked on a sponsored brand video, and after I clicked on it, I was like, "Well, let me watch this video." Because it's what we do, and so I wanted to analyze the video.

Brett Curry:

It was not a good video. It was like, "Hey. It projects the screen." It's not telling me anything.

Chris Tyler:

Here's how you turn it on.

Brett Curry:

Yeah, here's how you turn it on. Look, it will actually work. So it really wasn't telling me some of the deeper questions I had about the product, but it still got me to click, because it was video, and it was movement.

Chris Tyler:

Benefit of the placement, and the video, just it's so new.

Brett Curry:

Yep. It just works. So there's some novelty. I do think, as Amazon continues to push this ad unit, and they've already done that, they've moved from the bottom of the page on desktop to now mid-page, we're starting to see this for more and more searches. You'll have to up your game. You'll have to get better at creating videos. But we do a lot with YouTube, and I talk a lot on the podcast about YouTube. And I love YouTube, and crafting a great YouTube video ad.

Brett Curry:

Creating a good YouTube ad's kind of tough. You're talking about sort of like TV, but you got to be faster, and up front. Anyway, I won't divert us too much to YouTube. But creating a good YouTube ad's pretty difficult. Creating a really good sponsored brand video, video ad, is not as hard. And so we'll kind of walk through some of the details on that in just a minute.

Chris Tyler:

The other thing, not to cut you off Brett, but I'm really excited about this, is looking through all the ad charts that we're running sponsored brand video, I'm sure a question that listeners will have is what's the volume on it? Okay, it's great return, great placement, I'm sold. And what we see is normally a 5-10% of total ad spent.

Brett Curry:

We're seeing that increase, right? We're seeing the opportunity to push that and grow that.

Chris Tyler:

It is continually moving, yeah. So this is pretty new. Like three, four months of people absolutely leaning into it. We had a couple that were at the very beginning that are at the high end of 15%. And we do have some that are kind of creeping up on that 15%. And so if you look at your current ad spend, especially for sizeable accounts, but it doesn't have to only be that, you can quickly see that okay, I'm spending X-amount and here's my return. Do the math and say, hey, safe that is within two or three months you'll hit 10% volume, CPC's will be the same or a little lower. Not guaranteed, but should be around that range. And then A costs when you're enlisting 10-30% lower. So you can quickly see the impact that it can give you.

Brett Curry:

Yeah.

Chris Tyler:

And I know we'll talk about this later, but because it's CPC, you're not playing the guessing game. You know that the traffic's coming in, that the sales are attributed based on traffic going to your product page. So again, I would pause this, go get some videos, gloss up on your advertising account and come back.

Brett Curry:

You got to make this happen, for sure. And let's go ahead and just underscore that point so people know that this is a CPC ad unit, just like sponsored products. So you're paying only if someone clicks. And so that's important to underscore.

Brett Curry:

Chris, a couple of things. What products do you think are best suited for sponsored brand video, or is it just wide open?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah, so there's kind of several answers to that. The first one is they're all going to do well. Obviously there's tiers to how well in volume. I'll talk about the accounts that have done the best and utilizes the best. Just because it's so new to specific products that I don't have like, could this product do it or don't? I'm not sure.

Chris Tyler:

But where I've seen this utilized best is if you're in advertising still on Amazon, and you've got that 1-3 products, it's a no-brainer to get quality videos for those. Push them hard. They're high sellers for a reason. So I'm sure you've got search volume, search data to build off of, and just launch strong. And that's one of those where you don't really have a build up in the volume. You just kind of launch them, you know that things work, so you can get more aggressive with the budget.

Chris Tyler:

The other areas we've seen this work amazing is competitive spaces. So skin care, supplements. Where CPC's might be 2-4 dollars, sponsored brand videos coming in with bids maybe $1.20, $1.50, and as a percent perspective, 10-40% lower CPC's.

Brett Curry:

Yeah.

Chris Tyler:

Even though the placement's the best you can get.

Brett Curry:

Which is crazy. But it also, so, just so... You know... It's a better placement. The click through rate is higher. And we're actually paying lower CPC's. But if you think about it, if you're a long term advertising person, if you're an ad geek like myself, the same is true on Google. If you have a higher click through rate, Google's going to reward you with a lower CPC.

Brett Curry:

It appears that Amazon is doing something similar, where they're actually making more money on this ad type, because the click through rate is so much higher, and so they're kind of rewarding you with a lower CPC. And so really, it's a win win. It's a win for everybody.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. And to that point, so this can be for any of the competitive categories. We did a case study where the advertising did not have videos. And one of the things we get a lot with some of these categories is like what kind of video am I going to create? Somebody's taking pills in the morning, when it comes to the supplement space.

Brett Curry:

Right. Here's a close up of the pill. Isn't this cool?

Chris Tyler:

Real slow motion. And what they did.

Brett Curry:

Disco ball drops above. Yeah, exactly.

Chris Tyler:

What they did was more of like, we templated images with ad copy on it. Animoto was the tool that we used. But...

Brett Curry:

It is a tool. We're not affiliated. But it's a cool tool where you can upload little video clips or still images and it will kind of animate them for you.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

It doesn't create the best sponsored brand video ad. In fact, I'm beginning to like, oh man, we've got to do better than that. But...

Chris Tyler:

Well, you're a creative guy. This is annoying play.

Brett Curry:

Yeah, exactly. But if you want to test it, or you have a ton of products, you want to crank stuff out, it's still going to perform better than just the static images.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah, and so they did that. I don't know if they used Animoto, but it was that kind of setup. And within three months, it is now 15% of their total ad volume, their A cost is 30% better, their click through rate is 2.5% only. It's just kind of static image videos, where it's probably like an 8X of their average click through rate.

Brett Curry:

Wow.

Chris Tyler:

And it's just blowing out of the water.

Brett Curry:

So A costs 30-40% lower, click through rate 8X, and now it's 15% of ad spend. So that's the kind of things... If you can take your current results, grow it by 10, 15%, and really, we're seeing it grow pretty rapidly, so I think it's going to go beyond that, especially as Amazon starts showing these ad units more. And it's more efficient. Conversion rates are great. It's just really, there's so many good things going on here.

Chris Tyler:

And then the last one, I'll just tell them real quick, is we have several sellers that have like thousands of products. So they're concern was we can't do high quality for everything.

Brett Curry:

Right.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah, so they did it for their top products. But we also ran a separate case study saying all right, let's take 50 of your top products that really don't have enough sales, and we're dropping X-amount on custom videos. Built out some templated videos, and those are about 8% of the total ad spend. And this is a giant account. So it's bring in like 100 grand in ad sales, with the same thing. A cost is 20, 30% better, click through is 3X higher. I'm sure if we had custom video it'd be like 6, 7X. But I find, if you have a lot of products, going that route for now is great bang for the buck.

Chris Tyler:

And the only reason we're not scaling past that is we're building the next grouping of videos. So there really isn't any reason not to do it. It's just how you create the videos, what do they look like, it's definitely something every seller on Amazon should really take time to think on. But those are the three that came up as hey, these are awesome wins, that stood out to me.

Brett Curry:

Love it. And yeah, my advice would be, really, it doesn't matter what products you sell on Amazon. You should test this ad type. If you have a real high consideration product, some electronic, or maybe it's set at a higher priced product, or even a supplement, where someone really wants to know the details and the future benefit, and stuff like that, video's going to help you tell the story better than just any static image could. But really, I think just the power of the ad type, you should test it regardless of what you sell.

Brett Curry:

So let's do this. I want to dive in and talk about what separates a great sponsored brand ad video from an average one. And hey, average is okay here. Especially if you want to do something more elaborate, like a gray video for your top 2-3 hero products, and then something fairly quick and easy for the other products. I think that's a total viable strategy. But let's walk through here are about five tips that I've got for creating a great sponsored brand video ad.

Brett Curry:

So first one is you need to tell the story without sound. If the video is overly-dependent on a narrator or a voiceover, then you're starting off on kind of the wrong foot. Because these video ads do auto-play without sound. Someone has to click on them to enable the sound. So they're more like an Instagram video ad in that regard. So tell the story without sound. So visuals, text, things like that, very, very important.

Brett Curry:

The next one. Demonstrate the product. Show, don't tell. And what we've seen... I actually look at a lot of video, again, because the YouTube connection and sponsored brand video and .. So I'm looking at videos all the time. Saw this founder story for a really great product that I won't mention what it is on the podcast. But it was a great product. It was the founder's story, and the founder was talking about all her personal struggles leading up to inventing this product and how this product kind of changed her life, and now it's changing her customer's life. It was a beautiful video.

Brett Curry:

It would be a terrible sponsored brand video ad though, because a lot of it was just her on camera, talking, telling the story. Well, you got to get into the mind of the customer. As they see this ad, they're actively shopping. They're scrolling, they're shopping. So what are they looking for? They're looking for features, they're looking for benefits. They're looking for will this product fit for my need that I'm shopping for right now?

Brett Curry:

If I'm looking for a particular projector, I want to know the resolution, I want to know how big can this thing project, what kind of warranty it has, is it durable. I got kids knocking it over. What's going to happen? So what are people wanting to know about this product. So feature benefit.

Brett Curry:

Also, optimize for mobile viewing. Even though this ad is great on desktop, you want to optimize for mobile viewing. So what does that mean? That means tight product shots. On a small handheld device, you don't want to be way zoomed out and the product is tiny in the video. Zoomed in, cropped, text that's easy to read.

Brett Curry:

Chris, you and I were analyzing a video recently for a home décor client, and they had some text overlays. And the text was tiny. It was like nine font or something like that.

Chris Tyler:

And super faded, a little transparent, and I want to say less is more. There's so much you can say about your product. But pick a few, even if it's just four. That's much better than writing a paragraph that no one can see, and no one takes time to read.

Brett Curry:

Yep. Walls of copy. A screen that has five bullet points on it. No, no, no. That doesn't work.

Chris Tyler:

But when they get to product page, they can read that.

Brett Curry:

Exactly.

Chris Tyler:

They're just going to click through.

Brett Curry:

You want those. But put those on the product detail page. And so, don't overwhelm them. It's got to be optimized for mobile.

Brett Curry:

Answer the burning questions. What does the client actually care about? This is not a time for hyperbole around your product. And mysterious, "We live to solve problems." No. What does the product do? How durable is it? I want to see it in action. I want to know, again, my burning questions, I want you to answer them in the video. And I love the old Google mantra of hey, what if great ads are just answers to questions? And I think that totally applies here. And again, you're going to win if it's just a mediocre ad. But if it's a great ad, man, you can really do well.

Brett Curry:

Did you have a thought?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah, in regards to answering the question. It's an easy practice to kind of look at your search results and see one, what's performing well? And okay, they're not all questions, but they're looking for something. So you can tailor your video towards that, or make separate videos to target relevant search terms until you get that further.

Chris Tyler:

And then the other thing is the ones that don't get good click through but have high search volume in irrelevant. Think about why that might be the case, and if the video can answer that or speak to it. Especially at the beginning of the video. You might be able to get traffic from search terms that you're currently not able to with ads that don't really tell the story.

Chris Tyler:

So I'm a big fan of using the data you have. So looking at search term data is something I recommend.

Brett Curry:

Really smart. Totally agree. So look at your keyword data. Because really, a keyword search sort of is a question. What's best for this? Or I'm looking to solve this particular problem. I think another area to look at is your product reviews. What do people say over and over again about your product? Or one of the other strategies we talk about a lot just with Amazon in general is looking at some of the negative reviews that your category has, or that other products in your space have. What are the negative things? Because you can speak, then, against that. Hey, it doesn't fade or break or whatever. Whatever the negative things are, highlight that your product doesn't do those things, in the video.

Brett Curry:

So this is much more your QVC or your Billy May's or you're really selling the feature benefit, rather than you being Steven Spielberg and directing this beautiful, well shot video that's telling a complex story, right?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

And maybe there is a great story behind your product. Lead with demonstration. Lead with showing the product, and then back up and tell the story. But tell the story visually, tell the story with text, as well. Because people are often watching without sound.

Brett Curry:

So anyway, those are just a few tips. We've got more. There's actually a free guide that I highly recommend. The author's just brilliant, of this guy, and I read all his stuff. I'm actually about to make myself vomit. I wrote it. But check it out, it's free. At OMG Commerce, I'll link it to the show notes. But it's under guides, Sponsored Brand Video Success Guide. It's free. Check it out, get all the details there.

Brett Curry:

One thing we sort of touched on, but I just want to highlight this real quick, Chris, and then we've got to move on to DSP, although we can keep talking about sponsored brand video for probably another 45 minutes or an hours.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

Targeting. So this is keyword targeting. You kind of eluded to that, but you want to just kind of confirm that and share a snippet or two about that?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. Keyword targeting. You can only have one ASIN selected. Though I think they're coming out with an update for that soon. And when you ran video on search when it was Amazon managing, you could go to the storefront. At this time, you can't, but I do think that will come out. Which would be helpful for brand searches and things, when you want to show the whole kind of array of products you sell.

Chris Tyler:

And then the other thing I would mention kind of separate from this is in terms of getting access to it. Everyone should have access to sponsored brand video.

Brett Curry:

It's an opened beta.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. And we used to have issues where some accounts wouldn't. You either open a case with support or reach out to our agency rep, and we get it right away. So if you're brand registered and you go to create campaign sponsored brands, and it doesn't exist as an option, I would recommend reaching out to an Amazon exec if you have one, open a support case, or honestly, if none of those work, you can reach out to us, and we can have our rep handle that very quickly.

Brett Curry:

Yep. Just chat with us. You can go to the sign chat or shoot us an email. We're happy to assist and chat with you through that.

Brett Curry:

So let's transition. Let's talk about Amazon DSP. And this is also a huge topic. We could have a dedicated podcast just to Amazon DSP, and we might do that at some point in the future. But let me kind of explain what Amazon DSP is. So DSP stands for Demand Side Platform. And that's just a fancy way to say it's kind of a self-service platform where you can log in and build your campaigns, and build your ad groups and things like that. Although Amazon calls them something different. But it's like getting into Google ads and building campaigns and ad groups in ads.

Brett Curry:

What's beautiful though, about Amazon DSP, is it combines Amazon's shopper data, the data they have on you and I and all the shoppers on Amazon. And then it combines that with ad networks. Even the Google Display Network. They kind of go through the backdoor to access GDN inventory.

Brett Curry:

And so if you think about it, nobody really knows more about your shopping patterns and your shopping behavior then Amazon. If you're an Amazon customer and, in fact, my wife and I were talking about this the other day, I said, "Hey, how often do we have Amazon packages coming to our house?" And Brittany kind of made a funny face, and she said, "I think like most days."

Brett Curry:

But that's the way a lot of people are. And the pandemic just helped increase that and expand that. So Amazon has tons of shopper data. They know what you're in the market for, they know what you're searching for, they now what you buy. They know what you bought recently, they know what you're about to buy. All these things. And so, when you can take that data, and then layer that in, or use that to run targeted display ads on Amazon and off Amazon, you're talking about a pretty powerful tool. And a pretty powerful system.

Brett Curry:

And so I know a lot of people, a lot of business owners really don't like the idea of display ads. And that's because, hey, we've tried it in the past, and they haven't worked. Or I get served all kinds of cruddy display ads that I never click on. And so the real issue with display is if they're not targeted, they're a complete waste. But if they're targeted, and if they're presented in the right way, super, super powerful.

Brett Curry:

So let's talk about this, Chris. Let's talk about some of the audience targeting options that are available with Amazon DSP, because I think these are really some of the most interesting parts about DSP. And some really powerful targeting options here. And I think a couple options that will surprise some people.

Brett Curry:

So can you walk through some of the audience targeting options, and then I'll kind of chime in as you go here.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. Absolutely. So I'll kind of start at the lowest thing and work our way up. But the one that's the meat of it, at least people start, is re-targeting. So the ability to target people that have viewed your products ASIN's and who have not purchased. So what's really cool with and audience builder, that it's based off of whatever ASIN's you want to put in there, so a big question we get is, "Hey, I want to re-target, but I'm pairing ASIN, and there's eight.. ASINS. How does that work." You can group in any amount of ASIN's you want to build a re-targeting audience. The threshold for that is 5,000 unique visitors.

Chris Tyler:

So normally we do 30 days. That kind of fits the mold for when somebody's considered purchasing. But you can extend that, decrease that, if you think that the purchase period for consideration's less. And then...

Brett Curry:

So what Amazon is doing is Amazon needs... What Amazon's saying is for us to adequately build an audience here and run ads that'll be relevant and get you some traction, you need to have 5,000 unique shoppers on your single ASIN or group of ASIN's that you give us. And there's kind of a lookback window they consider, right? So is that the last 10 days, 15 days, whatever. And what you're saying is we usually look at a 30 day lookback window. So of a single ASIN or multiple ASIN's, 5,000 unique visitors to those ASIN's within the last 30 days.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. And it is customizable. And then the idea on the back end, you can exclude past purchasers. And that's similar, where you can do the past 30 days, past year. And that's a big thing when you kind of compare it with sponsored display. Re-targeting. There's just a lot more control there.

Chris Tyler:

You can group even different pair of ASIN sets and things like that. And the other one that is awesome for people that have products that are consumables is repurchasing. So same deal, where you can say, "My product is 30 days, everyone repurchases in that period, every 30. So I want to target people that have purchased the last 60 days, but not the last 30." And that's moveable. But the idea that you can hit people when they should be in the market for a reccurency thing. And depending on your aggressiveness, you can hit them a little early or a little later to kind of give them a nudge back.

Chris Tyler:

And that's one that just works great. It's low volume, in the sense that you don't have to allocate a huge budget to it. It's a finite audience. Same with re-targeting. You can very quickly understand how many people didn't purchase during that period, and allocate a budget that's not a high number just because it sounds good or returns great. Moving up.

Brett Curry:

Well, and I just want to highlight those really quickly.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

So re-marketing, re-targeting, been around forever. But having that ability where you can control it for an Amazon seller is relatively new. So thinking about hey, even though conversion rates are high on Amazon listings, they're still 90% or so, 80% if you have a really high conversion rate of people that visit your product are not purchasing. But they might purchase. And so, if you just give them a nudge, if you just remind them, if you just show them an ad pulling them back to your listing, you can close more of them. And then the loyalty piece, and that's kind the bucket we talk about, or the stage we talk about, as you eluded to, where hey, let's get someone to buy more.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

Let's either get them, if it's a consumable, if they've purchased, but they haven't purchased in the last 30 days, let's run an ad as a reminder. Or if they've only purchased one, but most people purchase multiple, then let's run an ad to them to get them to purchase more. Or maybe someone has bought one of our core products, and now we're extending the line, and now we're adding complimentary products. Let's run an ad to people that have purchased our products in the past to get them to buy more.

Brett Curry:

So that loyalty component. Something that, really, a lot of Amazon sellers just had to kind of hope happened.

Chris Tyler:

Yes.

Brett Curry:

They just had to rely on having a good quality product to make that happen, now you can bolster that with really powerful ad targeting, as well.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. I see your point. You kind of took the next one. The cross-promotion aspect.

Brett Curry:

Oh, sorry.

Chris Tyler:

That's all right. I've got so much in my head.

Brett Curry:

I'm just trying to one up you. I'm trying to steal your thunder here.

Chris Tyler:

And yeah, that's an awesome one, especially when there's so many brands that have products that are in the same category, but maybe somebody really wanted that suntan lotion, but didn't realize they had XYZ or whatever other product.

Brett Curry:

Yeah, I'm selling cutting boards, and I'm selling knives. Or I'm selling a knife set, and now I've added this new knife that any smart home cook needs to have, type of thing. So you got options to reach back out to your buyers.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. And the cool thing is the ad that's being shown, that product doesn't have to meet the threshold of 5,000 unique visitors. It's the audience being targeted.

Brett Curry:

Yep.

Chris Tyler:

And that's a big thing that, I think, can get confused with. Because if you have a new product, like you just said, you want to launch it strong. You can use your past purchasers, past viewers that didn't purchase. There's a lot of things that can be done there.

Brett Curry:

Awesome. So moving up.

Chris Tyler:

Moving up, and this one.

Brett Curry:

When we say moving up, think like bottom of funnel, also think smaller audiences moving up to larger audiences. So bottom of the funnel is repeat purchase loyalty, then cross-promotion. And then a little broader, a little higher up on the funnel is...

Chris Tyler:

Well, and actually, I know you teed me up, and now we're going back. But you can send to your storefront. So thinking cross-promotion and things like that. Just on a side note, it doesn't have to go on the product page. It can be on your storefront if you want to build more awareness.

Brett Curry:

Yep.

Chris Tyler:

The next one, which I love it, but there's inherent challenges. But it's got the most scale and the most bang from a buck in terms of aggressive growth is competitor targeting. Or custom in market, depending on who you talk to. And it's essentially the same logic as re-targeting, where you can target a group of ASIN's and exclude past purchasers, but you can do this on your own competitors.

Chris Tyler:

So let's say you're selling...

Brett Curry:

And this is one where, just to kind of underscore this, I think most people are going to be like, "What? What can you do hear?" I remember when I first heard this I'm like coming out of my chair, because I've been a marketer for all my adult life. And I'm like, "What? You can actually do this?" Because on the Google side, people ask this all the time. Like, "Can we re-target our competitor shoppers?" And I'm like, "Sure. Just call your competitor. Get them to allow you to put your remarketing code on their website. Get them to put your pixel there." And obviously, no, you can't re-target your competitors shoppers.

Chris Tyler:

It seems a little illegal.

Brett Curry:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, one, you couldn't do it unless you had something nefarious, or you could ask permission, which, you're going to get rejected. There's one sort of work around that I won't even get into. It's called custom affinity, but it's no where near what you can do here. So yeah, so you can give Amazon a list of your competitor's ASIN's, and they'll build an audience around that. And so, continue your thought there. You had said exclude purchasers.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. So the idea of, let's say you've got a cutting board. But it's a higher price point. It's a premium product. So you want to start going after competitor's that are in your price range, or low reviews. And so, I'm getting leads, but I think this is helpful. Maybe there's 100 total competitors, but you only want to go after 20 based on whatever metrics you put the most priority on.

Brett Curry:

The idea there is they have people shopping for these 20 ASIN's that I've selected are more likely to be my shopper. My product is more comparable from a price standpoint.

Chris Tyler:

Right. You've got an 80 dollar walnut cutting board that is gold plated, and there's a 10 dollar plastic cutting board set.

Brett Curry:

Yeah, don't target those shoppers. They're not the same shopper.

Chris Tyler:

Not necessarily. Especially at the beginning. Start with your lowest hanging fruit and scalable. But in that same line of reasoning though, so you're targeting those 20 ASIN's, but if somebody had already bought one of the other 80, are they really in the market again for a cutting board?

Brett Curry:

How many cutting boards do you need?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. Yeah. I think my wife has six. So I guess the answer is a lot.

Brett Curry:

You're probably maxed out.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

I don't know. Maybe if she saw the right ad. Maybe if she saw the gold plated walnut one you were talking about, she might have to go for it.

Chris Tyler:

For 80 bucks, I think she would.

Chris Tyler:

But the logic there says, "Okay, I want to target these 20 ASIN's. People who viewed them in the past 30 days, maybe past 14," that's a big audience. You can go smaller. But you want to exclude maybe 80 of those 100 competitors. Or all 100. So that's something that I think is missed sometimes where, I'm targeting these 20, I'll exclude the 20.

Chris Tyler:

That's nice. That's awesome. But you really want to expand that, because someone may have bought...

Brett Curry:

And when you said excluding, you said you're targeting them and excluding them. You're targeting the shoppers, but you're excluding people that have converted already.

Chris Tyler:

Right. Yeah, my mind's already moving to like, "I'm going to go set this up."

Brett Curry:

We're going to sell some fictitious cutting boards.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. People that have viewed those 20 ASIN's, let's say in the past 30 days, and exclude people that have bought all competitors past 60 days, 120 days, 30 days, whatever you want. The other thing you can do with that is you exclude your own brand from reviews and purchasers. That's also one of the biggest aspects where you're going, "I can't even be new to brand." And the idea is...

Brett Curry:

Because anybody's that viewed your product, you want your remarketing campaigns to capture that person.

Chris Tyler:

Right. And if they've already purchased, you've got a re-purchase campaign.

Brett Curry:

Right.

Chris Tyler:

The biggest thing that we focused on is segmentation and granularity. If something can be attributed several times or not control knowing where it's at, you're not doing yourself any service in terms of them being able to scale that and attribute appropriately. So yeah, absolutely, let your targeting take care of that. Exclude it from the competitor, so that it's 100% new to brand.

Chris Tyler:

And it's one of those that we talk on that. Like you said, you get excited. Like this is amazing.

Brett Curry:

You freak out about it. Yeah.

Chris Tyler:

And it is, but ti's not one of those that... All right, you set it up and you're 10X. And money's flowing from everywhere. So it is definitely a strategy that we pair with those lowering the funnel, retargeting, repurchasing.

Brett Curry:

Well, you've got to have those kind of things built first before you'll higher the funnel, for sure.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

Yeah. The thing that I would say about display, and if you've ever dabbled in Google Display Network or display ads, you're Yahoo or Gemini back in the day or whatever, display ads, not a set it and forget type of approach. It takes a lot of pruning and refining. And editing, and some things you thought would work don't work. It is a little more complex. I think that's why some people shy away from it.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

But the benefit there is really, really big.

Chris Tyler:

The benefit's huge, and the cool thing is you can get your retargeting purchase set. It's a finite audience. You set it, and you feed that funnel, and if you're looking for sales growth, that custom in market or competitor targeting will do that. Because once you do tweak it and find that sweet spot of return, both within DSP attribution and then the bottom line sale's actually growing, that's scalable. I won't say infinite, but it is very much scalable, where retargeting has a finite audience.

Chris Tyler:

And it does feed that funnel, which is an awesome thing, as well.

Brett Curry:

Yep. It absolutely does. And that's where really getting all these things together... Sponsored product, sponsored brand, sponsored brand video, getting your DSP retargeting, then you'll higher the funnel DSP, you can really create some magic here.

Brett Curry:

So we're kind of coming up against time here pretty quickly, but I want to highlight a few other things. So we've got this custom in market, I think, is that what you call it? Custom in market?

Chris Tyler:

Customer in market or competitor targeting.

Brett Curry:

Right. So that's what we just talked about, the competitor targeting, competitor conquesting is another work for it, too. Then if we wanted to go higher in the funnel, what are our options beyond that?

Chris Tyler:

Sure. So Amazon offers in-market audiences. So that is something that they create on their end, and it's basically people in the market for the categories given. So one might be premium skincare. Or Keto friendly products.

Brett Curry:

Organic dog food, things like that.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. These are massive audiences, upwards of hundreds of thousands of people to millions. But that, if you hit that, and get that working well, the scalability there is actually infinite. I don't think anyone could ever max that audience out.

Brett Curry:

Right. Because it's always being refreshed, right?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

One cool thing Amazon does here, they do this automatically, which is brilliant. Is they'll build this audience of people that are in the market for organic dog food, as an example. Once someone purchases the organic dog food, now they're removed from the list, and they're almost removed in real time. So you're not wasting impressions, running to someone who's in this end market audience, but really they just bought. And so Amazon keeps that updated, which is pretty exciting.

Chris Tyler:

And a side note, I know we're running up on time, but one of the things that we see is there's a lot of ad companies on Amazon that advertise through Google or through a site. So they're running display off Amazon, and DSP shows off and on Amazon. And Amazon offers the ability to actually pixel websites, so that you can exclude from your targeting people that have viewed that site. So the idea is maybe you're spending 100K on display for your site, and so you don't want to kind of cross streams and over pay for something in a space, but you're kind of competing in the bid.

Chris Tyler:

You can actually negate audiences to your site with that. And the other audiences are, you can actually do lookalike audiences based on your email list, if you have over 20,000. And you can also do lookalike for website traffic, as well. And you can target to specific audiences, like if you have 20,000 email list, or people that visit your site, but that's not normally the case in the sense it makes sense, because you want to go back to your site.

Chris Tyler:

I know I said that quickly, but those are a couple other things.

Brett Curry:

Yeah. I'm really glad you underscored that, and this kind of gets into a larger topic that we'll just touch on very briefly. But as we talk to clients, or as I interview people on the podcast, people that have their own website and sell on Amazon, there's a lot of debate on what should the strategy be there? Should I try to send people to my website, or should I try to send them to Amazon? And I think the best approach is if someone has clearly identified themselves as an Amazon shopper, I shop on Amazon, then send them to Amazon. That's what they want.

Brett Curry:

You try to force someone to change their behavior, it's not going to go that well. But if somebody has already been to your site, or they've already purchased from your site, or you still think you've got a chance of getting them to purchase on your site, then send them there. So I love that ability to segment, which you just talked about, where you can say, "Hey, this person has been to my site. Let's exclude them from our Amazon targeting. See if we can let our site retargeting, and some of the things we're doing off Amazon to point them there."

Chris Tyler:

Absolutely.

Brett Curry:

So then, going higher in the funnel than that, Chris, and mostly what we've talked about so far, that's where most advertisers are going to want to focus. And that's where they're going to want to spend most of their efforts. But there are other options in DSP. So do you want to talk about some other targeting options that are available?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. Absolutely. So the main one is lifestyle, or kind of interest targeting. And it kind of makes me laugh sometimes. There's an audience for people who like Denzel Washington movies. Legit.

Brett Curry:

But hey, Amazon knows that, right? Because of Amazon Prime.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah.

Brett Curry:

And people buying DVD's or whatever, for people that still do that.

Chris Tyler:

If you're selling Denzel Washington movie posters, we have the audience for you, so reach out after the podcast.

Brett Curry:

We can help people get more Denzel. And that's what a lot of people want.

Chris Tyler:

For sure.

Brett Curry:

What's interesting, as a side note, we actually learned this several years ago when we were going through our DSP training. We actually were one of the fastest growing agencies with Amazon DSP, so we got invited to the Amazon HQ, which was a lot of fun. Chris and I got to do that.

Brett Curry:

They were talking about some big movie releases will use Amazon DSP to do their new movie launch. Which makes sense, because you can do exactly what you said. Denzel Washington fans. Or these are people that have purchased Marvel merchandise, or Avenger merchandise. Well, let's market to them about the new Avenger movie coming out.

Chris Tyler:

And the cool thing is you can layer these audiences.

Brett Curry:

Layering.

Chris Tyler:

Let's say you've got an in market for... I can't think of something related to Denzel. But you're running an in market, and then you want to layer that with lifestyle. You can also add in demographics, which we don't do a ton, because even Amazon says they're not all exactly accurate. But you can do gender. So male, female is something we're testing for separate campaigns, to understand how they perform. Just separate creative space on gender.

Chris Tyler:

But I would look at...

Brett Curry:

Which makes a lot of sense, because maybe you're looking at an in market audience, but for whatever reason, because of the way you've positioned or built your product, or whatever, you're 60 or 70% female.

Chris Tyler:

Right.

Brett Curry:

And so, you can build out those audiences of in market or competitor targeting or whatever. But then layer in that gender demo targeting, and get a little more focused.

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. Layering works better for those. If you go after them as a standalone, usually doesn't perform great.

Brett Curry:

Yeah. But then you're kind of moving away from the real benefits of Amazon DSP, which is using that shopper behavioral data, and leveraging that for your benefit.

Chris Tyler:

Exactly.

Brett Curry:

So this was awesome. Man, we could keep going, and probably will need to ... You're probably going to get your wish, dang it.

Chris Tyler:

I hope everyone who's listening to this sends in, "Hey, we want more of a Chris and Brett. But Chris Tyler and Brett."

Brett Curry:

Chris Tyler. You will have to underscore that, because Chris Brewer, co-founder, will probably try to take credit. He'll try, probably try.

Chris Tyler:

Oh, for sure. For sure.

Brett Curry:

Yeah. But really good stuff. So again, we do have a resource here. It's the Amazon DSP Roadmap. It kind of outlines some of the things that we've talked about. It also talks about what do good ads look like, and so how do you build these DSP ads, and things along those lines. So check that out. It's available at OMGCommerce.com under guides, and then it's the DSP Roadmap. We'll also link to it in the show notes here for this show.

Brett Curry:

Kind of as the last thing, this will kind of be the last question I'll ask, because I think this is an important one, and I bet there are a lot of people listening that have this same question.

Brett Curry:

How does DSP compare to sponsored display? Because now, a lot of people have access to sponsored display ads, so you can do some of this stuff on your own, in the interface where you're building your sponsored products and all your other ads. DSP is a separate engine, it's a separate platform. What separates DSP from sponsored display?

Chris Tyler:

Yeah. And I think sponsored display is growing and pruning, so I don't want to knock it for the long term.

Brett Curry:

There will be improvements, just like any... It's kind of a minimum viable product that Amazon's going to iterate and improve on.

Chris Tyler:

And build on, yeah. There's no control in sponsored display. Builds on the retargeting side and then similar product use. Which is their variation of competitor targeting. Where in sponsored display it's really those are the two, and you can go into interests and things like that, though it's hit or miss, very much so.

Chris Tyler:

With DSP, there's probably hundreds of levers that we pull on every strategy. So at the beginning of the DSP conversation, we talked about all the different options. We didn't even talk on device type and supply stores. And what are the bids and placement kind of within those bids? And so, it's really night and day, where DSP we can control so much, and along those lines, also the time line of targeting. It's a separate call where we talk inside beta and consideration fans. We can see that on our end, so that we can segment different time periods to show different ads.

Chris Tyler:

So it's really control, level of scalability when you into competitor targeting. Sponsored display doesn't offer that at all, with in terms of picking ASIN's. And for me, there's no question DSP is layers ahead. But talk to me a year or two, and they may be closer, for sure.

Brett Curry:

Yeah. They may be more similar. Yeah, when you look at, and this will kind of underscore something we talked about a minute ago, but display has inherent risks. Display has waste built in. There are things that can cause a display campaign to just not be profitable. A lot of the controls we use to get to profitability, and to get to the level of efficiency we need, are not available in sponsored display. So they'll likely get there. It'll like catch up. I'm sure that it will in a lot of ways. But as of right now, yeah, we don't even consider them on the same playing field.

Chris Tyler:

Right, yeah.

Brett Curry:

Awesome. Chris, appreciate it, man. This has been fantastic. If you would like to chat with Chris Tyler, and potentially get an ad audit for your Amazon ad account, or just see how you can improve your performance, talk strategy, geek out on some of these full funnel build outs we've been talking about, Chris is available. He is in high demand, but he is available some to do that, so you can reach out to us at OMGCommerce.com. But with that, man, thanks for coming on. You nailed it. You crushed it.

Chris Tyler:

Thanks for having me.

Brett Curry:

Yep. Absolutely. So as always, we want to hear from you. Maybe give Chris Tyler some love. Because it sounds like he needs it. So reach out.

Chris Tyler:

I get so nervous with these, man.

Brett Curry:

You did awesome. So let us know what you'd like to hear more of, what you'd like to hear less of. Other show ideas. And with that, until next time, thank you for listening.

Brett Curry:

You nailed it.

Have questions or requests? Contact us today!

Thank you for reaching out! We'll be in touch soon.
Oops! Something went wrong! 

 More Episodes

Episode 135
Peter Awad - Mission Meats

Balancing Growth on Amazon & Your Own Store

Peter Awad is a long time eCommerce pro. Now he and his co-founder Nick have built a meat snack store with a mission.

Episode 134
Molly Pittman - CEO Smart Marketer & John Grimshaw - CMO Smart Marketer

Navigating Volatility with FB Ads and Turning Problems Into Opportunities

These are two of my favorite people to interview and today I have them both with me for the same episode. And it’s a doozy.

Episode 133
Brett Curry - OMG Commerce

5 Ways to Dominate the Cyber 5 in 2020

This year’s online holiday shopping season will be one for the record books.