Episode 183

3-Step Amazon Listing Optimization Formula

Daniela Bolzmann - MindfulGoods.co
November 17, 2021
SUBSCRIBE: iTunesStitcher

Growing your sales on Amazon really comes down to three things:

  • Getting found on Amazon by improving your organic rankings or paying for ads.  
  • Getting more people to click on your listings once they see it.  
  • Convincing more shoppers that your product is the one for them.

It sounds simple enough right? But most Amazon sellers miss several key tactics that severely limit growth. That’s why I was so excited to talk to Daniela Bolzmann founder of Mindfulgoods.co. She is a PRO at making products on Amazon stand out. She’s so good, in fact, that Amazon created a case study featuring her work.  

Here’s a look at what we unpack on this episode:

  • How to maximize your SEO efforts for launching new products on Amazon
  • How to integrate and tweak existing listings that already rank to get them to rank HIGHER
  • Leveraging your 6 images for maximum conversions
  • What to do with A+ content to make your product nearly irresistible 
  • How Yes Bar gets it right with their listing optimization and storefront optimization
  • Top Amazon listing mistakes sellers make and how to avoid them

Mentioned in This Episode:

Daniela Bolzmann

Via LinkedIn

MindfulGoods.co

Mindful Goods Course: Launch Ready Listings

In mentioned order:

Helium 10

Jungle Scout

Viral Launch

Yes Bar

PickFu

eE 73 John Li - PickFu

RX Bar
Mindful Goods Course: Launch Ready Listings

Ezra Firestone

YouTube Course with Ezra Firestone and Brett Curry

A+ Content on Amazon

Yes Bar Storefront on Amazon





Brett:

Well, hello, and welcome to another edition of the eCommerce Evolution podcast. I'm your host, Brett Curry, CEO of OMG Commerce. And today, we're talking Amazon listing optimization. I love this topic. It's a topic that will probably never go away, right? As long as there's Amazon, as long as we're trying to maximize that channel, we have to think about listing optimization. And so my guest today is someone who came highly, highly recommended to me. We had a great chat kind of prepping for this, and so super excited to dive into this chat with Daniela Bolzmann. She's the founder of mindfulgoods.co the one-stop-shop for Amazon listings done better. This female-led agency supports passionate brand builders to step up their Amazon game and they provide done-for-you services to help you sell more. So this is what she does day in and day out. She's got a very simple, straightforward, but powerful three-step approach to optimizing listings, and that's what we're going to dive into today. So Daniela, how's it going and welcome to the show.

Daniela:

Yeah, thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here.

Brett:

Really excited we can make this happen. I think after a few reschedules and other craziness. We're both busy. But thanks for being flexible and thanks for being here today. And so before we dive into kind of the three steps to optimizing your listings, what's your background? How did you gain this expertise in the Amazon world? Was that your dream from the time you were a small child?

Daniela:

Actually, I've always been very entrepreneurial-minded. I've always been a creative. I come from a 10-year-plus marketing background and I actually had a tech startup before this. So, very different. I was in logistics and decided to-

Brett:

So logistics, tech startup, and marketing. That's a great combo.

Daniela:

Yeah, a lot of that has carried over. I used to be what I'd call a Jill of all trades, where I'd dabble in a bit of everything because I'd like to understand it, and then manage a team. But what I noticed is with remote working is there's this whole migration happening of, I had an office with 20 employees and I felt like I was in my '20s, but I was a mom and loved my company, loved what we were building, but realized in this next iteration of what I wanted to build, I wanted to have a remote team. And so I wanted to focus on e-commerce and around the same time was when Amazon had bought Whole Foods. My family has a CPG business, so I had asked them if I could learn the Amazon ropes by way of their product.

Daniela:

And once I went through that process and realized how hard it was for me, a seasoned marketer and entrepreneur, I realized that there was going to be some huge learning curves for other smaller teams, other brand builders, emerging brands out there, right? So I started getting into just regular retainer agency work, had a small team, and then realized that we were turning away a lot of brands that just needed help getting from A to B on Amazon. They didn't necessarily have the funds to go out and hire a full service agency. So we kind of flipped our model, and now we just do done-for-you listing optimization to help brands get that first step on Amazon.

Brett:

That's awesome. I love it. Love that background. And yeah, I think that it's just the most natural way to build a business, right, is you experience a pain point yourself and you figure out the solution, then you realize, "Hey, there's a lot of other people that need this solution as well." And that's what you did. And so, let's dive right into it. So let's talk about these three ways to optimize Amazon listings. And why don't you kick us off with step number one, and then I'll have several questions and we'll dive into that.

Daniela:

Sure. Actually, we have a very in-depth version of this that we call the buy-now method, but we tried to make it as simple as possible and just get it down to three simple steps so that everyone can feel like they can accomplish this. The first step is actually getting found through your SEO. And while every Amazon consultant out there is going to tell you as a brand builder that there's 150 things you need to be doing at all times, when you're first getting started on Amazon and you're setting up your listings, these are really just the three things you need to focus on. So the first one is SEO. Amazon is a search engine, and so I can't tell you the number of clients that have come to us and they've copy pasted from their website, gotten their listing up and running, but they're wondering why are we getting no traffic?

Daniela:

Why are we getting no sales? Well, if people can't find you on Amazon, it's most likely because you haven't done your SEO research. So that's the first step, right? And so there's a number of different tools that are out there that can help you get this data quick. And then once you start running your advertising later, you can then optimize even further. But 80% of the work can be done in advance with lots of different tools. You really only need a couple of them, but they all kind of do the same thing, right? Helium 10, Jungle Scout, Viral Launch, all of these great tools will basically help you do all of this research, aggregate it into some sort of spreadsheet, and then figure out which keywords are most relevant so you can infuse it into your listing copy.

Brett:

Yeah, I love this. And I don't want to give away the other two steps, right, but I love the simplicity of thinking about it this way, that there are really kind of three things to do here. Because if you are not selling what you want to be selling, if you're not growing at the pace you think you should be growing, it really is going to come down to one of these three things. Right? And then, there could be dozens of, or hundreds of little tweaks or things you could do related to each one, but think about this in big topics, I think really helps you know what kind of action to take.

Brett:

And so, yeah, the first step is, are you found, right? Amazon is a huge marketplace. And primarily, people still interact with it by searching, by using search queries to find the product they want. So if you are not being found, then nothing else really matters. So our first step is kind of identifying keywords by using these tools. And yeah, we like to use kind of a combo of those. I think maybe the favorite at OMG Commerce is Helium 10, but I love the other ones as well.

Daniela:

We actually just switched to Helium 10, to shout out to them. But we actually use a combination. We like to do a two-step process of a reverse ASIN first. And we do that-

Brett:

Can you explain what that is for those don't know?

Daniela:

Yeah, so a reverse ASIN is basically a little bit of a cheat code, right? So with a tool like WordTree, or any of these other tools too, we use WordTree for this one, but we'll go and grab the ASIN, which is the specific SKU number that Amazon is giving your product that shows up in your URL and on your listing. But that ASIN and your competitor's ASINs, let's say, up to 10 of them, you can drop into this tool, and it'll go and scrape their listing and tell you which words are most frequently used on those listings, which ones are used in common across the listings, and which ones of those would be most relevant in terms of volume and density of search.

Daniela:

So those that's really the first step that we take. And the reason why we do that first is because we just need something quick, and a base to go off of when we're doing the listing copy. Because when we're writing the copy, initially, we're really writing the listing with a sales-forward approach, right? We're writing it in the tone and feel of the brand. And then we want to use persuasive sales copy throughout. And then we want to infuse a base of keywords initially that it is going to be our competitor round up in that reverse ASIN search. And then once we have that, we'll go through and do a second pass with the deeper dive of SEO research that we've done within one of those other tools, like a Helium 10.

Brett:

Nice. And so would you do that second pass of SEO research, that's after launching the listing or that's before ...

Daniela:

No, no, no. That's before. It's all before. But it's just our process, because when you're working with our team, we're dealing with multiple people. We have a person that's just doing SEO research and a person that's a professional copywriter, and those two minds have to come together. And so that's the process we came up with to help them have their meeting of the mind.

Brett:

It's really smart, and, typically, someone who's a great copywriter doesn't want to be confined to the world of keywords to a certain degree, and then someone who's into keywords is a little more analytical. And so yeah, a process to get those two to come together is critical.

Daniela:

Right. And the client, at the end of the day, they just want their product to sound like their product. They don't want all these weird keywords in there, even though that's what helps you get found. So you do have to have that mindset going into it. Cool.

Brett:

Now, do you have any advice, so that's if you're launching, right? And I know the process is similar if you're just optimizing, but take a seller who is already established on Amazon. What should they be considering or looking at here to see, but maybe they're not being found like they would like to be, what would the process look like for them?

Daniela:

Okay. So they should still do the same process. There's a caveat here, though. If you're already selling well, which you're saying they're not, but if they are, you have to be careful about how much you are updating your listing and where you're updating your listing. Because if you're a seasoned seller, you've likely already been indexed by Amazon throughout your listing. So you don't really want to change too much. And when you do make changes, you want to make them sparingly, and in places that won't de-index your entire listing. So that being said, that would be like, let's say, you have title that's performing well. You would put maybe some extra keywords that you see are converting from your search term reports in the back side of the title. You wouldn't just-

Brett:

Right. Keeping the title mostly intact. You're just adding to the end of it.

Daniela:

Yeah. Don't delete the whole title and then put in a new one. Leave the title, maybe delete some of the extra words that you weren't finding relevant or weren't seeing conversions on, and then replace them with some other keywords that you're trying to rank for, right? Same thing in the bullets. Back end, yeah, same thing. So, now, let's say you're not selling well. If you're-

Brett:

Well, just as a quick note, if you're selling, then the rule number one should be, goal number one should be do no harm, right? Let's not go backwards. Let's take little tweaks, little iterations, to hopefully gain some momentum.

Daniela:

So what we do, actually, on seasoned sellers is we'll do a reverse ASIN on their listing, and we'll just try to find out, okay, what are they ranking well for, don't touch any of that. And actually, there's a good amount of brands that came to us last year during COVID, when they were switching their budgets from in-store to online. They basically said, "We've been selling on Amazon, but we've been neglecting it. So we want to double down and refresh our listings." And so we had to take that approach with a lot of clients. We had to just play it safe in certain areas. And then for some clients, they just weren't performing well after a while, because new competitors enter the marketplace, they didn't really keep their listings fresh, or maybe they didn't update it, or looking at your search terms reports to see what is converting and then adding it back into your listing. It's just that ongoing maintenance stuff.

Brett:

How often should you do that? So if you're not keeping it up to date, is that a monthly, is that a weekly, what would you typically recommend for adding keywords back in?

Daniela:

If you're running a significant number of ads, I guess it would depend on your ad spend, right? If you're running tens of thousands of dollars of ads, I wouldn't see why you wouldn't do it monthly. And that's a simple thing that your ads manager could probably pass off to you so you can update into your listing or that they can manage for you.

Brett:

Totally. Yeah. And so as an ad management company, we do the same thing with campaigns, right? We're looking at doing broad match or phrase match and finding, converting keywords and adding those back into the campaigns at the ad level, to further optimize and perform. But it totally makes sense to then add those back into the listings, as it makes sense. Obviously, there are space limitations to a certain degree and stuff like that.

Daniela:

And then there's certain brands that come to us and like you said, they're not selling well at all. And in that case, it's just a matter of ripping off the bandaid and just doing a clean refresh.

Brett:

Yeah. Can't really hurt it if it's broken already. So let's make bigger movements. Yeah. If something is broken, making little tweaks isn't going to get you there, right? That's too slow of a road. You need to make more dramatic changes at that point. Yeah. Awesome. Okay.

Daniela:

Yeah. So in that case, we'll update copy, we'll update graphics, we'll update everything across the board and just won't even look back.

Brett:

Cool. Now I know, back in the day, the priority was product title, then bullet points, then back end keywords. Is that kind of still the same priority order or anything you would add to that?

Daniela:

So we do backend search terms and subject matter, because we found in certain categories, subject matter is indexing. But yes, title first, obviously.

Brett:

Cool. Cool. Awesome. Great. So step one, getting found. What's step number two?

Daniela:

Step two is the fun one. It's the one nobody likes to talk about for some reason. It's the one that's-

Brett:

I don't hear many people talking about this, but it's so important.

Daniela:

Honestly, it's the lowest hanging fruit in the Amazon marketplace. I feel like it's the neglected piece that can make such a big difference. And we worked with a company brand called YES Bar. And within two weeks, they saw an 11.8% increase in clickthrough traffic. And so that's just one emerging brand. Imagine if you have a larger portfolio, the returns on that. It's huge. So what does this mean?

Brett:

And Amazon loves that increased clickthrough, right? I mean, that is music to their ears. Obviously, increased conversion rates really music to their ears. But if you're clicking, you're going to get more conversions. You're going to move up in the rankings. It's a no brainer.

Daniela:

Yeah. So this one's a fun one. It's actually my favorite one to work on, because I feel like this is a thing that everyone can do. This is a thing that it doesn't cost you very much, and you can see significant gains from it. So what this is is basically when you show up in the search results and you see your product next to everyone else's, what can you do to your main image to make sure that people are looking at you first and then clicking on you, right? Yes, price. Yes, reviews. All of that, that happens over time, but you don't get that right away. So what can you do right now to make sure that people are clicking on your listing, right? And so in the case of YES Bar, let's just break down what we did for them, right?

Daniela:

So what they had was a beautiful image. It was a case pack of their product with a stacked closeup of the snack bar. The problem with it was there was a lot of white space around the edge. So it looked smaller than everyone else's products in the search results. And it was kind of diluted in terms of resolution, so it wasn't popping off the page. It didn't look crisp and clear, and it didn't draw the eye, right? They did have what I would call eye candy, which is the closeup of the snack, right, which, anytime you can add eye candy, it's a win. So I always recommend adding some kind of eye candy and a post-edit, if necessary, to clarify the purchase. So a post-edit would be something like showing is it a six-pack or is it a twelve-pack, right? Or is it-

Brett:

So calling that out with superimposed text or some kind of little graphic or something.

Daniela:

Yeah. And here's where you have to be careful, right? Because, you're not trying to manipulate the buyer. You're trying to aid the buyer in the process. And so that's what it comes down to in the Amazon world. Amazon wants to know if you're aiding the buyer or manipulating the buyer. You never want to be manipulating the buyer. You never want to show something in the photo that's actually not going to show up to the consumer. You never want to make your product look so fake that when people get it, they're like, " This isn't what I ordered." So renders are a touchy subject. We do renders. I think, personally, some products just show better in renders than they do in photos, so we do very, very realistic renders on a lot of products and have seen increased performance.

Daniela:

So in that case, in the case of YES Bar, you would have a version that's polished of the case pack that is taking up the full frame of the photo, that has a post-edit showing how many bars are in there, that has a post-edit showing the main things that people are searching for in relation to that product. So is it vegan? How many grams of protein, or whatever the things are, right, put that on the box. And then a super crystal clear closeup of those snacks so people can see what they're actually getting, because with food, people want to, they want to taste it. They want to smell it.

Daniela:

The next closest thing is you have to show them a closeup. And then how do you make sure that all of that on the page is working together and it's enticing people to look and click on your product? So, that's where you can have a little bit of fun with this. It's a creative process. So what we do is we come up with two, maybe three different variations of what we think could be interesting. We'll go and look at different categories to get some ideas. We'll look at their exact competitors to see what's showing up in search. And then we'll just do really low fidelity testing on a tool like PickFu, which if use the code-

Brett:

PickFu is a great tool. I know those guys they were actually on the podcast. It's been about a year.

Daniela:

Yeah. And FYI, if you use the code, I think it's PickFu MG, you get 50% off your first poll because we're an ambassador agency and we love them. But we actually run this with almost, I think, every single client project that comes in, because it has such huge benefits. So we'll run a split test.

Brett:

And so quick explanation, you can go back and listen to the PickFu episode if you want to, but, basically, you're submitting images and real people are reviewing them and giving you feedback. And so it's a way to get feedback on images-

Daniela:

Amazon shoppers.

Brett:

Yeah, Amazon shoppers.

Daniela:

Amazon Prime members. You can target Amazon Prime members. You can target within your very specific audience, too. So if you have a pet product, you can target pet owners. Baby product, parents. You can target by age, you can target by gender, everything. It's phenomenal, and you get the results usually within an hour, which is fantastic.

Brett:

Yeah, it's so cool. And I love this step, this getting clicks and really focusing on the image, because this is really all about merchandising, right? If we're thinking about the digital shelf, we have to think more like, and this is, I think, one of the things that's lost with a lot of digital marketers, is we maybe get too nerdy and too focused on SEO and rankings and algorithms and keywords, and all those are important, right? I've been doing SEO since 2004. I love it. But we got to think like the consumer, right? This is comparison shopping on a digital shelf, and appearances matter big time. And so remembering that someone is trying to solve a problem or trying to meet a need or fulfill a desire or whatever, and how does the image communicate that and show that? Exactly. That's why we simplified this process into get found, which is SEO, get clicks, which is your main image, and then get sales, which is everything inside the listing. Right? And what sells, is imagery. I think there was a stat that said 90% of what we take in as humans is visual, right? So if you're looking at a listing and you're trying to understand if you want to buy something, you better be enticing people through all of the visuals, right?

Brett:

Yeah. So, fully agree. The image is so important. And you mentioned YES Bar. I'll mention a competitor, just because I think what's interesting about this company is a lot of the innovation is with packaging and simplicity. So if you look at RXBARs, right, which they've now become popular, you can buy at Walmart or whatever. What's that?

Daniela:

That's solid branding, right there.

Brett:

Solid branding. And what was their innovation? They put three or four ingredients, they put it on the front of the package. It's three dates, two almonds, three egg whites, that's it, right? And so wow, how cool is that? Very simple, very visual, and it works, right? That's why I bought the product in the first place. Then I heard the whole brand story and it's cool, and the product is great.

Brett:

But, yeah, think about visual merchandising, right? We talk about this a lot. We do a lot of Google traffic and Google shopping. We're a big Google shopping agency. And we run into this all the time with Google shopping. Clients will come to us and say, "Our products are showing up in Google shopping, but we're not getting the return or the volume we need." And I just had a skincare company that we started working with recently, and their product packaging is black and they put the product on a black background. Okay. Well this is not going to sound like rocket science, but I think we found the biggest problem here, and it's people can't see what they're clicking. Anyway. So it's simple stuff like that. Merchandising is super important. So, that's fantastic. Any other tips or suggestions? I love the PickFu example. I love the call out ...

Daniela:

Do the split test. I mean, really, within that step, we broke down all the things that we do, like with the post-edits, with the eye candy, all the different types of eye candy. We actually have all of this in little tutorials inside of our mini course on our website. It's called launchreadylistings.com. But yeah, it's 37 bucks. And literally every single thing that we're talking about right now, there's little tutorials that go with everything. So if anyone wants to do this themselves and doesn't want to hire us, there you go.

Brett:

Sweet. 37 bucks, can't beat that. I'll link to that in the show notes as well. What's at URL one more time before we go to step number three?

Daniela:

Launchreadylistings.com. And actually, we train our designers on that, too. So other designers could be doing this.

Brett:

So hey, if you ... internally, means it's legit. That's right. So I did a YouTube course with Ezra Firestone. We send all our new YouTube specialists through that course. We believe in it. So it's good stuff. Eat your own dog food, right? What was that, a Purina thing or something? They literally had people eat their own dog food. Anyway.

Daniela:

I would not eat Purina. Sorry, Purina.

Brett:

And then Google adopted that though, too. They always say their thing is say, do we eat our own dog food, do we test our own products and stuff? Anyway. It's a bit of a rabbit trail there. Okay. So we got get found, get the click. What's step three?

Daniela:

Step three is once you've gotten them inside your listing, how are you getting those shoppers to convert, right? And so this is a matter of figuring out what are the types of graphics and persuasive copy that need to be layered in a show and tell format. Some people call it lifestyle infographics, but it's basically, what is the way that you're visually showing, and telling at the same time, the same thing that you're trying to say in your bullets, right? Because people can skim the bullets and that's what they probably do, but they're not sitting there and reading every single thing that you're putting in your listing, right? So you really want to make sure-

Brett:

They're scanning, right? They're scanning and looking for answers to questions or looking for something to kind of jump out at them. And then maybe they're ...

Daniela:

Right. They're skimming. Yeah. So it's really a matter of going through every single thing that you're trying to say, and trying to think of how you're going to visually show that on your listing.

Brett:

So I love this, too. And again, let's take an offline example or metaphor here. So I'm in the store and now I've picked something off the shelf, right? The packaging did enough to make me want to pick it up off the shelf. Now I'm examining it more closer, right, or I'm pulling this item of clothing off the rack or whatever. So I'm digging a little bit deeper. So, that's the PDP. That's the product detail page. What are you doing to close the deal, to seal the deal? And it really is what questions do people have? What use case are they going to be using product like that?

Daniela:

Right. Answer every single question they could possibly have. So an example, any food product, the first question people have right now is what the heck is in this? That's what everyone wants to know. What do most brands do? They upload a photo of the back of the bag that is really crappy quality, can barely read it, and even if you zoom in, you're like, "Oh, this looks terrible." It just looks terrible. So what can you do? You can call out every single ingredient. Let's say you have a clean label. YES Bar is actually a good example. They have very simple ingredients in their label. Just list it out and make it so easy for people. This is the only stuff in our product. If you want the nutritional facts, it's right here next to it.

Daniela:

And by the way, it falls into all of these dietary categories. If you're looking for paleo, if you're looking for this, that. Put little icons so that people can easily understand what this is and what it isn't, right? Those are the questions that people want to know right up front. So if you know those things about your consumer, think through those and figure out how you're going to address all of those at once, right? So, that's your product images on the left. Some of the things that I see that's really powerful for brands that you could be doing is an us versus them image. Those are super powerful on Amazon, right? Because you're saying, "We only have these things in our product. Other brands do all of this, which is icky."

Daniela:

So it's like, we're better. Here's why. So how can you visually show this? The other thing is helping people identify with your product. So people want to see themselves. They want to identify in some kind of way, right? So is this a product for moms? Let's show some moms. Is this a product for dads? Let's show some dads. Let's have fun and show people. And you don't have to have an expensive photo shoot to do this stuff. There's incredible stock photography sites that you can pull from to create these very realistic images of people holding your product and using your product to help people identify with your product.

Daniela:

So product in use. So showing is there specifics on how to build this, how to clean it, how to assemble it? Whatever the things are, write a list of all the things, narrow it down to the top six, make beautiful image that show and tell at the same time. What I see often is either people uploading just stock images on white of every angle of their product, which I don't understand why people do that.

Daniela:

Or we see people uploading a bunch of lifestyle images that don't tell you anything, which it's cool. It's pretty. Okay, it's probably on your Instagram, too. But it doesn't tell the shopper anything. And the shopper has questions that need to be answered. So layer some text on there and get it done. So, that's product images. And then when you scroll below the fold, for anyone that doesn't know what that means, it's basically when you scroll down on the Amazon listing and you don't see the product images at the top anymore, there is one more section that brands can take advantage of that's called well, it's called A+ content. You can get it if you're a registered brand with Amazon, which basically means you have a trademark or you have a trademark pending. And so if you get access to this, you can basically upload an entire nother section of beautiful imagery to help sell your product.

Daniela:

Amazon themselves has said that this section alone can lift your sales by 5% or more. And that's taking into consideration even the brands that are not doing it great. And then there was a study that came out a week or two ago, I think it was DataHawk or somebody said that they were seeing, I think it was 20 to 200% increase in sales lift from brands going from zero to adding A+ content. So, I mean, that's super powerful and this is an analysis across hundreds of thousands of listings.

Daniela:

So I mean, A+ content is something that I feel like every brand should be doing. I think that there's brands that do it well and don't do it well. What I'd recommend doing is, or what we do, is we do basically stacking these huge banners, one on top of the next, to create a landing-page-like effect, rather than doing all of the other Amazon modules that are really text heavy, and then it feels very hodgepodgey. So if you want to see examples of this, actually, it's all over our website. And actually, Amazon recently created a guide from some of the work that we did with a brand called Bowery Farming. And they actually highlighted all of these things that we're talking about today in terms of showing and telling with your graphics and using big banners, and that was pretty exciting.

Brett:

Yeah. I love this so much. And one of the things I heard long ago in a marketing course or from a really sharp marketing person was, going back to images, the saying is an image speaks 1,000 words, right? An image is worth 1,000 words, but the key is what thousand words? What are you trying to communicate? And I think a lot of people don't think about their photo enough to say, "Okay, what am I trying to accomplish with this photo?" Because I think, to your point, people either go, "Hey, it's just a plain old image of the product," or it's just a lifestyle image, and we have no idea what this means. It's a family in their front yard. What are they doing? Where you really need to see, show me the product in action.

Brett:

Show me that it will hold up in this use case. Show it doing what I want it to do. And so, yeah, you got to tell a story with those photos and then also with A+ content. And we see this a lot, too, as we're evaluating. I think just a lot of people, and I don't want to say lazy, although I think that's sometimes it. We're spoiled, because Amazon has so much traffic. And if you have decent reviews and okay images, you'll sell on Amazon. But if you think about this like merchandising and like someone building a brand, you can do so much better. If you maximize all these spaces, your six product images, your A+ content, your bullet points, get it all working together, man, it can have a huge, huge impact.

Daniela:

The other thing is that, remember, there's still a camp of people out there that are very anti-Amazon. And so those people may never shop on Amazon. But as there's more negative press out there about Amazon, there's ways that you can counter that and help educate people around you that you are a brand in this neighborhood, who is creating this product and selling it on Amazon, so it is your livelihood, right? And so I notice a lot of people kind of hide behind their product and are afraid to put themselves out there and say, "Hey, we're a female-owned business. We support animal welfare." This, that, and the other, right? But that kind of stuff is so powerful for the end consumer, for the shopper to know that there's a real human behind this that has a family, that's supporting other families, and they care about these things in the world. And that makes the buying process feel so much better than just I'm shopping on Amazon. Right?

Brett:

It does, yeah. And, excuse me, especially when you do everything else right as well, right? You've got good images and a good headline, and you look at and you think, "I want this product." Then when you can marry that with this is a female-led company and we're focused on these initiatives, or we've got these environmental initiatives where we're doing 1% for the planet or whatnot, then that makes you feel so good about making the purchase.

Brett:

I think you can't lean too much into that. If your listing is broken or if you got bad reviews or other things, then that doesn't matter. But if you can add that on top of everything else being great, it's fantastic. And I love how business is moving in that responsible way and kind of cause-driven marketing. I do enjoy that. I'm glad that's happening and that's a trend. Awesome. Cool. So we got these three ways. So being found, getting the click, getting the conversion. Anything else you would add to that, kind of as we're wrapping up? And it's perfect to have three, but any other tips, suggestions, ideas, anything else you would add to that?

Daniela:

Well, I know anyone listening is probably wondering what about storefronts? So I will say that a couple things that we're really excited about with storefronts recently is that Amazon has this feature called background videos, which I don't know if you've had a chance to play around with those at all, but you can have up to four of them on your product page or, sorry, on your storefront. And I hope they roll this out to A+ content, because I think it's a really engaging way to shop, and I think it's a lot of fun.

Daniela:

But YES Bar's storefront is a really great example. We put two of them in there. You can have up to four. But they basically are videos playing with no sound that just are on a loop. So what we did is we created these animated gifs and play them as a video. And it's just this really fun, engaging content to break up all the static, still images that are on the page, right? And so you're able to kind of reengage the shopper and keep them in that environment, and tell them all the things that you want to tell them before they're getting to the next section. So, love that.

Brett:

Yeah, this looks fantastic. I'm looking at the YES Bar-

Daniela:

People forget about media mentions.

Brett:

I'm looking at the YES Bar storefront right now. Really great. Such fun branding.

Daniela:

Really fun, right?

Brett:

Yes, I see those videos ...

Daniela:

Their name is a mantra, so we just went with it and had a lot of fun. People forget about media mentions. If you have media mentions within 18 months, you can put up to four of those in your A+ content, and I don't think there's a limit on storefront. So you might have to put a little footnote to get it approved by Amazon to say when the most recent publication was, but they have to be within 18 months, and then you can put up to four of them in your A+ content, and what a great way to build trust and validate for the shopper. So that's huge. I always recommend doing that. And this is a little iffy, but we always try to build a testimonial image into the product images. So that's a little fun bonus one for you.

Brett:

Yeah. So putting an actual review, or a customer saying something in the images.

Daniela:

Yeah. And I think this is a wishy-washy area, because sometimes Amazon says you're not allowed to have testimonials. But we've gotten feedback from Amazon that you can, as long as it's verifiable in your comments, in the reviews. So if it's a real Amazon shopper's review and that's in your reviews, just take the tidbit that you love and build it into a beautiful testimonial image so people see it right when they hit your page. They don't have to scroll all the way down. Because you know everyone, once they get a couple questions answered, they just scroll right down to those reviews. So give it to them. Yeah.

Brett:

Awesome. Well, Daniela, this has been fantastic. Your company, Mindful Goods, mindfulgoods.co, check it out. I'll link to it in the show notes as well. But why don't you, one more time, talk about that course. Sounds like an amazing value and a great way to dive in. And then any other ways for people to connect with you, who you work with, that type of thing.

Daniela:

Sure. So this is for the DIY brand-builders out there, any designers at agencies that are looking to pick up more Amazon work. This is a great little mini course that we created with our exact three-step process and tutorials for all the process to show you how we do this. It's at launchreadylistings.com and it's just $37. So you can't beat that.

Brett:

Cannot beat it. All right, Daniela, thank you so much. This has been a ton of fun.

Daniela:

Thank you.

Brett:

Highly insightful and motivating, as well.

Daniela:

Thanks so much.

Brett:

Awesome. Thanks, Daniela. And thank you for tuning in. We'd love to hear back from you. Let us know what you like about the show. Give us some topic suggestions, connect with us on the socials. Also, if you find this episode helpful, share it with a friend. Don't be bashful. Let's get other people involved in the show as well. And with that, until next time, thank you for listening.



















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